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Articles taggués ‘Apache’

How To Use Apache JMeter To Perform Load Testing on a Web Server

12/11/2017 Aucun commentaire

Introduction

In this tutorial, we will go over how to use Apache JMeter to perform basic load and stress testing on your web application environment. We will show you how to use the graphical user interface to build a test plan and to run tests against a web server.

JMeter is an open source desktop Java application that is designed to load test and measure performance. It can be used to simulate loads of various scenarios and output performance data in several ways, including CSV and XML files, and graphs. Because it is 100% Java, it is available on every OS that supports Java 6 or later.

 

Prerequisites

In order to follow this tutorial, you will need to have a computer that you can run JMeter on, and a web server to load test against. Do not run these tests against your production servers unless you know they can handle the load, or you may negatively impact your server’s performance.

You may adapt the tests in this tutorial to any of your own web applications. The web server that we are testing against as an example is a 1 CPU / 512 MB VPS running WordPress on a LEMP Stack, in the NYC2 DigitalOcean Datacenter. The JMeter computer is running in the DigitalOcean office in NYC (which is related to the latency of our tests).

Please note that the JMeter test results can be skewed by a variety of factors, including the system resources (CPU and RAM) available to JMeter and the network between JMeter and the web server being tested. The size of the load that JMeter can generate without skewing the results can be increased by running the tests in the non-graphical mode or by distributing the load generation to multiple JMeter servers.  Lire la suite…

How To Install and Secure phpMyAdmin on Ubuntu 16.04

05/11/2017 Comments off

Introduction

While many users need the functionality of a database management system like MySQL, they may not feel comfortable interacting with the system solely from the MySQL prompt.

phpMyAdmin was created so that users can interact with MySQL through a web interface. In this guide, we’ll discuss how to install and secure phpMyAdmin so that you can safely use it to manage your databases from an Ubuntu 16.04 system. 

Prerequisites

Before you get started with this guide, you need to have some basic steps completed.

First, we’ll assume that you are using a non-root user with sudo privileges, as described in steps 1-4 in the initial server setup of Ubuntu 16.04.

We’re also going to assume that you’ve completed a LAMP (Linux, Apache, MySQL, and PHP) installation on your Ubuntu 16.04 server. If this is not completed yet, you can follow this guide on installing a LAMP stack on Ubuntu 16.04.

Finally, there are important security considerations when using software like phpMyAdmin, since it:

  • Communicates directly with your MySQL installation
  • Handles authentication using MySQL credentials
  • Executes and returns results for arbitrary SQL queries

For these reasons, and because it is a widely-deployed PHP application which is frequently targeted for attack, you should never run phpMyAdmin on remote systems over a plain HTTP connection. If you do not have an existing domain configured with an SSL/TLS certificate, you can follow this guide on securing Apache with Let’s Encrypt on Ubuntu 16.04.

Once you are finished with these steps, you’re ready to get started with this guide.

Lire la suite…

How To Secure Apache with Let’s Encrypt on Ubuntu 16.04

25/03/2017 Comments off

Introduction

This tutorial will show you how to set up a TLS/SSL certificate from Let’s Encrypt on an Ubuntu 16.04 server running Apache as a web server. We will also cover how to automate the certificate renewal process using a cron job.

SSL certificates are used within web servers to encrypt the traffic between the server and client, providing extra security for users accessing your application. Let’s Encrypt provides an easy way to obtain and install trusted certificates for free. 

Prerequisites

In order to complete this guide, you will need:

  • An Ubuntu 16.04 server with a non-root sudo user, which you can set up by following our Initial Server Setup guide
  • The Apache web server installed with one or more domain names properly configured through Virtual Hosts that specify ServerName.

When you are ready to move on, log into your server using your sudo account.

 

Step 1 — Install the Let’s Encrypt Client

First, we will download the Let’s Encrypt client from the official repositories. Although the Let’s Encrypt project has renamed their client to certbot, the client included in the Ubuntu 16.04 repositories is simply called letsencrypt. This version is completely adequate for our purposes.

Update the server’s local apt package indexes and install the client by typing:

  • sudo apt-get update
  • sudo apt-get install python-letsencrypt-apache

The letsencrypt client should now be ready to use.

 

Step 2 — Set Up the SSL Certificate

Generating the SSL Certificate for Apache using the Let’s Encrypt client is quite straightforward. The client will automatically obtain and install a new SSL certificate that is valid for the domains provided as parameters.

To execute the interactive installation and obtain a certificate that covers only a single domain, run the letsencrypt command like so, where example.com is your domain:

  • sudo letsencrypt --apache -d example.com

If you want to install a single certificate that is valid for multiple domains or subdomains, you can pass them as additional parameters to the command. The first domain name in the list of parameters will be the base domain used by Let’s Encrypt to create the certificate, and for that reason we recommend that you pass the bare top-level domain name as first in the list, followed by any additional subdomains or aliases:

  • sudo letsencrypt --apache -d example.com -d www.example.com

For this example, the base domain will be example.com

After the dependencies are installed, you will be presented with a step-by-step guide to customize your certificate options. You will be asked to provide an email address for lost key recovery and notices, and you will be able to choose between enabling both http and https access or forcing all requests to redirect to https. It is usually safest to require https, unless you have a specific need for unencrypted http traffic.

When the installation is finished, you should be able to find the generated certificate files at /etc/letsencrypt/live. You can verify the status of your SSL certificate with the following link (don’t forget to replace example.com with your base domain):

https://www.ssllabs.com/ssltest/analyze.html?d=example.com&latest

You should now be able to access your website using a https prefix.

 

Step 3 — Set Up Auto Renewal

Let’s Encrypt certificates are valid for 90 days, but it’s recommended that you renew the certificates every 60 days to allow a margin of error. The Let’s Encrypt client has a renew command that automatically checks the currently installed certificates and tries to renew them if they are less than 30 days away from the expiration date.

To trigger the renewal process for all installed domains, you should run:

  • sudo letsencrypt renew

Because we recently installed the certificate, the command will only check for the expiration date and print a message informing that the certificate is not due to renewal yet. The output should look similar to this:

   Processing /etc/letsencrypt/renewal/example.com.conf

   The following certs are not due for renewal yet:
     /etc/letsencrypt/live/example.com/fullchain.pem (skipped)
     No renewals were attempted.

Notice that if you created a bundled certificate with multiple domains, only the base domain name will be shown in the output, but the renewal should be valid for all domains included in this certificate.

A practical way to ensure your certificates won’t get outdated is to create a cron job that will periodically execute the automatic renewal command for you. Since the renewal first checks for the expiration date and only executes the renewal if the certificate is less than 30 days away from expiration, it is safe to create a cron job that runs every week or even every day, for instance.

Let’s edit the crontab to create a new job that will run the renewal command every week. To edit the crontab for the root user, run:

  • sudo crontab -e

You may be prompted to select an editor:

Output
no crontab for root - using an empty one

Select an editor.  To change later, run 'select-editor'.
  1. /bin/ed
  2. /bin/nano        <---- easiest
  3. /usr/bin/vim.basic
  4. /usr/bin/vim.tiny

Choose 1-4 [2]:

Unless you’re more comfortable with ed or vim, press Enter to use nano, the default.

Include the following content at the end of the crontab, all in one line:

crontab

30 2 * * 1 /usr/bin/letsencrypt renew >> /var/log/le-renew.log

Save and exit. This will create a new cron job that will execute the letsencrypt-auto renew command every Monday at 2:30 am. The output produced by the command will be piped to a log file located at /var/log/le-renewal.log.

For more information on how to create and schedule cron jobs, you can check our How to Use Cron to Automate Tasks in a VPS guide. 

 

Conclusion

In this guide, we saw how to install a free SSL certificate from Let’s Encrypt in order to secure a website hosted with Apache. We recommend that you check the official Let’s Encrypt blog for important updates from time to time.

Phishing: Un développeur web recommande l’utilisation de « rel=noopener »

17/05/2016 Comments off

Pour empêcher les attaques par hameçonnage lancées en se servant du window.opener

phishingEn HTML, l’attribut “rel” peut être utilisé sur les balises <a> (qui permet de créer un lien hypertexte pointant vers un document en spécifiant l’URL de celui-ci au niveau de l’attribut « href” et qui permet également de définir des ancres au sein d’un document et les liens pour y accéder), <area> (qui permet de définir une zone particulière d’une image et peut lui associer un lien hypertexte) et <link> (qui permet de définir l’emplacement d’un fichier qui sera accessible au sein de la page où elle est déclarée couramment utilisée pour mettre en relation d’autres documents comme les feuilles de style).

Dans ces différentes balises, il est utilisé pour détailler la relation existante entre le document courant et le document qui sera ouvert par le lien et il prend pour valeur des éléments d’une liste de différentes relations dont les valeurs sont séparées par des virgules (par exemple “alternate”, “author”, “bookmark”, “help”, “license”, “next”, “nofollow”, “noreferrer”, “prefetch”, “prev”, “search”, “tag”).

Mathias Bynens, un développeur web front-end dans la ville de Termonde en Belgique, a voulu partager avec la communauté des développeurs web les bienfaits de l’une des valeurs de l’attribut “rel”, notamment “noreferrer” qui permet entre autres de résoudre un problème, mais lequel ?

En guise de démonstration, dans un billet blog il a proposé une petite expérience. Bynens propose les URL index.html et index/malicious.html. En définissant un lien vers la seconde URL avec l’attribut “target” qui avec la valeur “_blank”, cela va déclencher l’ouverture de la page cible dans une nouvelle fenêtre (dans ce cas la page malicious.html). Pour rappel, lorsqu’une fenêtre est ouverte depuis une autre fenêtre, elle conserve une référence à cette première fenêtre dans window.opener. Si la fenêtre courante n’a pas été ouverte par une autre fenêtre, la méthode renvoie null.

Bynens note que « le document malicious.html dans cette nouvelle page a l’élément windows.opener qui pointe vers l’élément window du document que vous regardez actuellement, c’est-à-dire index.html. Ce qui signifie que lorsque l’utilisateur clique sur le lien, malicious.html a un contrôle total sur l’objet window du document ». Dans le cas d’espèce, malicious.html vient remplacer l’onglet contenant index.html par index.html#hax, qui affiche un message caché.

« Ceci est un exemple relativement inoffensif, mais le lien aurait pu rediriger vers une page d’hameçonnage conçue pour ressembler à la vraie page index.html, demandant des informations de connexion. L’utilisateur ne l’aurait probablement pas remarqué, parce que l’accent est mis sur la page malveillante dans la nouvelle fenêtre tandis que la redirection se passe en arrière-plan. Cette attaque pourrait être encore plus subtile en ajoutant un retard avant de rediriger vers la page de phishing en arrière-plan », a-t-il avancé.

Dans cet exemple, index.html et index/malicious.html ont la même origine. Mais Bynens a indiqué qu’il est possible d’effectuer la même attaque avec des origines différentes.

Que faire pour empêcher que les pages n’abusent de window.opener ? Bynens recommande simplement de se servir de “rel=noopener”, « cela va permettre de vous assurer que window.opener a la valeur “null” sur Chrome 49 et Opera 36. Pour les navigateurs plus anciens, vous pouvez vous servir de “rel=noopener” qui va également désactiver l’en-tête HTTP “Refer”, ou alors vous servir de ce script JavaScript qui va potentiellement activer le bloqueur de popup.

var otherWindow = window.open();
otherWindow.opener = null;
otherWindow.location = URL;
Ne vous servez pas de “target=_blank” (ou tout autre “target” qui ouvre un nouveau contexte de navigation) en particulier pour les liens dans le contenu généré par l’utilisateur, à moins que vous n’ayez une bonne raison ».

Il a déjà averti les éditeurs de navigateurs dans des rapports de bogues. Le problème semble corrigé du côté de Chrome et Opera, mais pas encore chez Firefox, Safari et Edge.

Source : billet Mathias Bynens

Categories: Logiciel Tags: , , ,

Apache Web Server Hardening & Security Guide

13/05/2016 Comments off

apache security best practicesSecure Apache Web Server – Practical Guide

1       Introduction

The Web Server is a crucial part of web-based applications. Apache Web Server is often placed at the edge of the network hence it becomes one of the most vulnerable services to attack. Having default configuration supply many sensitive information which may help hacker to prepare for an attack the web server.

The majority of web application attacks are through XSS, Info Leakage, Session Management and PHP Injection attacks which is due to weak programming code and failure to sanitize web application infrastructure. According to the security vendor Cenzic, 96% of tested applications have vulnerabilities. Below chart from Cenzic shows the vulnerability trend report of 2013.

This practical guide provides you the necessary skill set to secure Apache Web Server.  In this course, we will talk about how to Harden & Secure Apache Web Server on Unix platform. Following are tested on Apache 2.4.x and I don’t see any reason it won’t work with Apache 2.2.x.

  1. This assumes you have installed Apache on UNIX platform. If not, you can go through Installation guide. You can also refer very free video about how to Install Apache, MySQL & PHP.
  2. We will call Apache installation directory /opt/apache as $Web_Server throughout this course.
  3. You are advised to take a backup of existing configuration file before any modification.

1.1  Audience

This is designed for Middleware Administrator, Application Support, System Analyst, or anyone working or eager to learn Hardening & Security guidelines. Fair knowledge of Apache Web Server & UNIX command is mandatory. This is seven page guide, click on Next to proceed. You may navigate through table of contents at right hand side.

 

BONUS (Download in PDF Format): Apache HTTP Security & Hardening Guide

Lire la suite…

13 Apache Web Server Security and Hardening Tips

29/04/2016 Comments off

Apache-Security-Tips1We all are very familiar with Apache web server, it is a very popular web server to host your web files or your website on the web. Here are some links which can help you to configure Apache web server on your Linux box.

Here in this tutorial, I’ll cover some main tips to secure your web server. Before you apply these changes in your web server, you should have some basics of the Apache server.

  • Document root Directory: /var/www/html or /var/www
  • Main Configuration file: /etc/httpd/conf/httpd.conf (RHEL/CentOS/Fedora) and /etc/apache/apache2.conf(Debian/Ubuntu).
  • Default HTTP Port: 80 TCP
  • Default HTTPS Port: 443 TCP
  • Test your Configuration file settings and syntax: httpd -t
  • Access Log files of Web Server: /var/log/httpd/access_log
  • Error Log files of Web Server: /var/log/httpd/error_log

1. How to hide Apache Version and OS Identity from Errors

When you install Apache with source or any other package installers like yum, it displays the version of your Apache web server installed on your server with the Operating system name of your server in Errors. It also shows the information about Apache modules installed in your server.

Show-Apache-Version

Show-Apache-Version

In above picture, you can see that Apache is showing its version with the OS installed in your server. This can be a major security threat to your web server as well as your Linux box too. To prevent Apache to not to display these information to the world, we need to make some changes in Apache main configuration file.

Open configuration file with vim editor and search for “ServerSignature“, its by default On. We need to Off these server signature and the second line “ServerTokens Prod” tells Apache to return only Apache as product in the server response header on the every page request, It suppress the OS, major and minor version info.

# vim /etc/httpd/conf/httpd.conf (RHEL/CentOS/Fedora)
# vim /etc/apache/apache2.conf (Debian/Ubuntu)
ServerSignature Off
ServerTokens Prod
# service httpd restart (RHEL/CentOS/Fedora)
# service apache2 restart (Debian/Ubuntu)
 

Hide-Apache-Version

2. Disable Directory Listing

By default Apache list all the content of Document root directory in the absence of index file. Please see the image below.

Apache-Directory-Listing

Apache-Directory-Listing

We can turn off directory listing by using Options directive in configuration file for a specific directory. For that we need to make an entry in httpd.conf or apache2.conf file.
<Directory /var/www/html>
    Options -Indexes
</Directory>
Hide-Apache-Directory-Listing

Hide-Apache-Directory-Listing

Lire la suite…

How to turn off server signature on Apache2 web server

29/04/2016 Comments off

Question: Whenever Apache2 web server returns error pages (e.g., 404 not found, 403 access forbidden pages), it shows web server signature (e.g., Apache version number and operating system info) at the bottom of the pages. Also, when Apache2 web server serves any PHP pages, it reveals PHP version info. How can I turn off these web server signatures in Apache2 web server?

Revealing web server signature with server/PHP version info can be a security risk as you are essentially telling attackers known vulnerabilities of your system. Thus it is recommended you disable all web server signatures as part of server hardening process.

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Disable Apache Web Server Signature

Disabling Apache web server signature can be achieved by editing Apache config file.

On Debian, Ubuntu or Linux Mint:

$ sudo vi /etc/apache2/apache2.conf

On CentOS, Fedora, RHEL or Arch Linux:

$ sudo vi /etc/httpd/conf/httpd.conf

Add the following two lines at the end of Apache config file.

ServerSignature Off
ServerTokens Prod

Then restart web server to activate the change:

$ sudo service apache2 restart (Debian, Ubuntu or Linux Mint)
$ sudo service httpd restart (CentOS/RHEL 6)
$ sudo systemctl restart httpd.service (Fedora, CentOS/RHEL 7, Arch Linux)

The first line ‘ServerSignature Off‘ makes Apache2 web server hide Apache version info on any error pages.

14879982016_7c7b8bbf3d_o

However, without the second line ‘ServerTokens Prod‘, Apache server will still include a detailed server token in HTTP response headers, which reveals Apache version number.

14902970535_e84ec23090_z

What the second line ‘ServerTokens Prod‘ does is to suppress a server token in HTTP response headers to a bare minimal.

So with both lines in place, Apache will not reveal Apache version info in either web pages or HTTP response headers.

14902970505_d79225f25d_z

Hide PHP Version

Another potential security threat is PHP version info leak in HTTP response headers. By default, Apache web server includes PHP version info via « X-Powered-By » field in HTTP response headers. If you want to hide PHP version in HTTP headers, open php.ini file with a text editor, look for « expose_php = On », and change it to « expose_php = Off ».

14899917981_aaef71eb0a

On Debian, Ubuntu, or Linux Mint:

$ sudo vi /etc/php5/apache2/php.ini

On CentOS, Fedora, RHEL or Arch Linux:

$ sudo vi /etc/php.ini

expose_php = Off

Finally, restart Apache2 web server to reload updated PHP config file.

Now you will no longer see « X-Powered-By » field in HTTP response headers.

Source: Xmodulo

How to Restrict IP Addresses from Accessing your Web Server using .htaccess

07/04/2016 Comments off

If you are running the Apache Web Server or your web hosting provider running Apache based web server, you can use .htaccess configuration file to restrict access to your website. This could be a very important issue from security stand point of view especially if your server is being attacked or hacked from any specific or range of IP addresses.

Now, restricting access method works in two ways. First, you can restrict access to certain IP addresses and allow others. Second, you can restrict access to everyone but few IP addresses only. On this post, I will focus on both method and will try to explain as much as I can.

Restrict Certain IP Addresses

If you want to restrict specific IP addresses from accessing your site, you can use the following lines on your .htaccess file.

order deny,allow
deny from 123.4.5.6
deny from 654.3.2.1
allow from all

These lines above will block “123.4.5.6” and “654.3.2.1” IP addresses from accessing your site. You can add as many IP addresses as you want on this “deny from” list. One interesting fact is, Apache web server gives you lot more flexibility in terms of blocking IP addresses. Take a look at the following lines.

order deny,allow
deny from 123.4.5.
allow from all

If you observe it carefully, you will see that the fourth set of digit is missing on this IP address. It means, if any IP address that matches the first three set of digits will be blocked. So basically anyone with IP address like “123.4.5.1” or “123.4.5.244” won’t be able to access your site as in both IP address matches with the first three (123.4.5.) sets of digits blocked by the Apache web server.

Allow Specific IP Addresses

Think of about a site that you built for a very specific purpose and for very few people, where you do not want everyone to show up. Apache allows you to do that as well.

For an example, lets assume that you built a site that you want one of your friend to be able to access and his IP address is “123.4.5.12”. Simply write the following line on your .htaccess file and you are good to go.

order allow,deny
allow from 123.4.5.12
deny from all

In this case Apache will block all IP addresses except your friends IP address. This is as simple as it can get and I hope you got the basic idea.

Note: On all of my example I used either “allow from all” or “deny from all” at the bottom, this is very important. You must declare either one of these line based on your requirement or things might get little more complicated.

Also remember that all blocked IP addresses would be forwarded or shown an “403 Forbidden” error message. You can definitely customize this message as well but that’s something I will talk about in another post.

Source: iftekhar.net

How to configure virtual hosts in Apache HTTP server

18/03/2016 Comments off

Source: Xmodulo

Virtual hosting refers to the technique that allows a physical server to host more than one website domain (e.g., site1.com, site2.com). Virtual hosting is prevalent in shared web hosting environments, where typically hundreds or more of websites or blogs are packed on a single dedicated server to amortize server maintenance cost.

You are not a web hosting company? Sure, virtual hosting can still be useful to you. For example, you can place multiple websites of yours on one VPS that you rent out, saving on your VPS cost. To serve multiple domains on a VPS, you just need to configure as many virtual hosts on its web server, and point the domains to the static IP address of your VPS.

Due to its usefulness, virtual hosting is supported by all modern web server software such as Apache, Nginx, Lighttpd, IIS. In this tutorial, I will demonstrate how to create and enable virtual hosts in Apache HTTP server under Linux environment. There is slight difference in the configuration between Debian-based and Red Hat-based systems. I will highlight the difference along the way.

Before I start, I assume that Apache HTTP server is already installed on your Linux server. If you haven’t, refer to our tutorials for Debian or Red Hat based systems, and install Apache server before proceeding.

As an exercise, let’s create a virtual host for domain abc.com on Apache web server.

Step One: Create Document Root Directory for Abc.com Domain

Start by creating a directory which will hold the web pages for abc.com. This directory is known as « document root » for the domain. Following the common practice, let’s organize all document root directories under /var/www, and name them after the corresponding domains. Also, create a dedicated log directory for abc.com under /var/log.

$ sudo mkdir /var/www/abc.com
$ sudo mkdir /var/log/apache2/abc.com (Debian, Ubuntu, Mint)
$ sudo mkdir /var/log/httpd/abc.com (Fedora, CentOS, RHEL)

Create a test webpage for the domain:

$ sudo vi /var/www/abc.com/index.html
<html>
  <head>
    <title>Welcome to Abc.com</title>
  </head>
  <body>
    <h1>Sample page</h1>
    This page is powered by Apache Virtual Host!
  </body>
</html>

Change the ownership of the document root directory to the user that Apache web server runs as.

On Debian, Ubuntu or Linux:

$ sudo chown -R www-data:www-data /var/www/abc.com

On Fedora, CentOS or RHEL:

$ sudo chown -R apache:apache /var/www/abc.com

Lire la suite…

Categories: Logiciel Tags: ,

How to analyze and view Apache web server logs interactively on Linux

17/03/2016 Comments off

analyze apache logsWhether you are in the web hosting business, or run a few web sites on a VPS yourself, chances are you want to display visitor statistics such as top visitors, requested files (dynamic or static), used bandwidth, client browsers, and referring sites, and so forth.

GoAccess is a command-line log analyzer and interactive viewer for Apache or Nginx web server. With this tool, you will not only be able to browse the data mentioned earlier, but also parse the web server logs to dig for further data as well – and all of this within a terminal window in real time. Since as of today most web servers use either a Debian derivative or a Red Hat based distribution as the underlying operating system, I will show you how to install and use GoAccess in Debian and CentOS.

Installing GoAccess on Linux

In Debian, Ubuntu and derivatives, run the following command to install GoAccess:

# aptitude install goaccess

In CentOS, you’ll need to enable the EPEL repository and then:

# yum install goaccess

In Fedora, simply use yum command:

# yum install goaccess

If you want to install GoAccess from the source to enable further options (such as GeoIP location), install required dependencies for your operating system, and then follow these steps:

# wget http://tar.goaccess.io/goaccess-0.8.5.tar.gz
# tar -xzvf goaccess-0.8.5.tar.gz
# cd goaccess-0.8.5/
# ./configure --enable-geoip
# make
# make install

That will install version 0.8.5, but you can always verify what is the latest version in the Downloads page of the project’s web site.

Since GoAccess does not require any further configurations, once it’s installed you are ready to go.

Running GoAccess

To start using GoAccess, just run it against your Apache access log.

For Debian and derivatives:

# goaccess -f /var/log/apache2/access.log

For Red Hat based distros:

# goaccess -f /var/log/httpd/access_log

When you first launch GoAccess, you will be presented with the following screen to choose the date and log format. As explained, you can toggle between options using the spacebar and proceed with F10. As for the date and log formats, you may want to refer to the Apache documentation if you need to refresh your memory.

In this case, Choose Common Log Format (CLF):

15868350373_30c16d7c30

and then press F10. You will be presented with the statistics screen. For the sake of brevity, only the header, which shows the summary of the log file, is shown in the next image:

16486742901_7a35b5df69_b

Lire la suite…