Archive

Archives pour la catégorie ‘Sécurité’

How To Secure Apache with Let’s Encrypt on Ubuntu 16.04

25/03/2017 Comments off
Print Friendly

Introduction

This tutorial will show you how to set up a TLS/SSL certificate from Let’s Encrypt on an Ubuntu 16.04 server running Apache as a web server. We will also cover how to automate the certificate renewal process using a cron job.

SSL certificates are used within web servers to encrypt the traffic between the server and client, providing extra security for users accessing your application. Let’s Encrypt provides an easy way to obtain and install trusted certificates for free. 

Prerequisites

In order to complete this guide, you will need:

  • An Ubuntu 16.04 server with a non-root sudo user, which you can set up by following our Initial Server Setup guide
  • The Apache web server installed with one or more domain names properly configured through Virtual Hosts that specify ServerName.

When you are ready to move on, log into your server using your sudo account.

 

Step 1 — Install the Let’s Encrypt Client

First, we will download the Let’s Encrypt client from the official repositories. Although the Let’s Encrypt project has renamed their client to certbot, the client included in the Ubuntu 16.04 repositories is simply called letsencrypt. This version is completely adequate for our purposes.

Update the server’s local apt package indexes and install the client by typing:

  • sudo apt-get update
  • sudo apt-get install python-letsencrypt-apache

The letsencrypt client should now be ready to use.

 

Step 2 — Set Up the SSL Certificate

Generating the SSL Certificate for Apache using the Let’s Encrypt client is quite straightforward. The client will automatically obtain and install a new SSL certificate that is valid for the domains provided as parameters.

To execute the interactive installation and obtain a certificate that covers only a single domain, run the letsencrypt command like so, where example.com is your domain:

  • sudo letsencrypt --apache -d example.com

If you want to install a single certificate that is valid for multiple domains or subdomains, you can pass them as additional parameters to the command. The first domain name in the list of parameters will be the base domain used by Let’s Encrypt to create the certificate, and for that reason we recommend that you pass the bare top-level domain name as first in the list, followed by any additional subdomains or aliases:

  • sudo letsencrypt --apache -d example.com -d www.example.com

For this example, the base domain will be example.com

After the dependencies are installed, you will be presented with a step-by-step guide to customize your certificate options. You will be asked to provide an email address for lost key recovery and notices, and you will be able to choose between enabling both http and https access or forcing all requests to redirect to https. It is usually safest to require https, unless you have a specific need for unencrypted http traffic.

When the installation is finished, you should be able to find the generated certificate files at /etc/letsencrypt/live. You can verify the status of your SSL certificate with the following link (don’t forget to replace example.com with your base domain):

https://www.ssllabs.com/ssltest/analyze.html?d=example.com&latest

You should now be able to access your website using a https prefix.

 

Step 3 — Set Up Auto Renewal

Let’s Encrypt certificates are valid for 90 days, but it’s recommended that you renew the certificates every 60 days to allow a margin of error. The Let’s Encrypt client has a renew command that automatically checks the currently installed certificates and tries to renew them if they are less than 30 days away from the expiration date.

To trigger the renewal process for all installed domains, you should run:

  • sudo letsencrypt renew

Because we recently installed the certificate, the command will only check for the expiration date and print a message informing that the certificate is not due to renewal yet. The output should look similar to this:

   Processing /etc/letsencrypt/renewal/example.com.conf

   The following certs are not due for renewal yet:
     /etc/letsencrypt/live/example.com/fullchain.pem (skipped)
     No renewals were attempted.

Notice that if you created a bundled certificate with multiple domains, only the base domain name will be shown in the output, but the renewal should be valid for all domains included in this certificate.

A practical way to ensure your certificates won’t get outdated is to create a cron job that will periodically execute the automatic renewal command for you. Since the renewal first checks for the expiration date and only executes the renewal if the certificate is less than 30 days away from expiration, it is safe to create a cron job that runs every week or even every day, for instance.

Let’s edit the crontab to create a new job that will run the renewal command every week. To edit the crontab for the root user, run:

  • sudo crontab -e

You may be prompted to select an editor:

Output
no crontab for root - using an empty one

Select an editor.  To change later, run 'select-editor'.
  1. /bin/ed
  2. /bin/nano        <---- easiest
  3. /usr/bin/vim.basic
  4. /usr/bin/vim.tiny

Choose 1-4 [2]:

Unless you’re more comfortable with ed or vim, press Enter to use nano, the default.

Include the following content at the end of the crontab, all in one line:

crontab

30 2 * * 1 /usr/bin/letsencrypt renew >> /var/log/le-renew.log

Save and exit. This will create a new cron job that will execute the letsencrypt-auto renew command every Monday at 2:30 am. The output produced by the command will be piped to a log file located at /var/log/le-renewal.log.

For more information on how to create and schedule cron jobs, you can check our How to Use Cron to Automate Tasks in a VPS guide. 

 

Conclusion

In this guide, we saw how to install a free SSL certificate from Let’s Encrypt in order to secure a website hosted with Apache. We recommend that you check the official Let’s Encrypt blog for important updates from time to time.

Iptables Allow MYSQL server incoming request on port 3306

24/03/2017 Comments off
Print Friendly

MySQL database is a popular for web applications and acts as the database component of the LAMP, MAMP, and WAMP platforms. Its popularity as a web application is closely tied to the popularity of PHP, which is often combined with MySQL. MySQL is open source database server and by default it listen on TCP port 3306. In this tutorial you will learn how to open TCP port # 3306 using iptables command line tool on Linux operating system.

Task: Open port 3306

In most cases following simple rule opens TCP port 3306:

iptables -A INPUT -i eth0 -p tcp -m tcp --dport 3306 -j ACCEPT

The following iptable rules allows incoming client request (open port 3306) for server IP address 202.54.1.20. Add rules to your iptables shell script:

iptables -A INPUT -p tcp -s 0/0 --sport 1024:65535 -d 202.54.1.20 --dport 3306 -m state --state NEW,ESTABLISHED -j ACCEPT
iptables -A OUTPUT -p tcp -s 202.54.1.20 --sport 3306 -d 0/0 --dport 1024:65535 -m state --state ESTABLISHED -j ACCEPT

However in real life you do not wish give access to everyone. For example in a web hosting company, you need to gives access to MySQL database server from web server only. Following example allows MySQL database server access (202.54.1.20) from Apache web server (202.54.1.50) only:

iptables -A INPUT -p tcp -s 202.54.1.50 --sport 1024:65535 -d 202.54.1.20 --dport 3306 -m state --state NEW,ESTABLISHED -j ACCEPT
iptables -A OUTPUT -p tcp -s 202.54.1.20 --sport 3306 -d 202.54.1.50 --dport 1024:65535 -m state --state ESTABLISHED -j ACCEPT

Please note if you follow above setup, then you need tell all your hosting customer to use 202.54.1.50 as MySQL host in PHP/Perl code. A better approach is to create following entry in /etc/hosts file or use fully qualified domain name (create dns entry) mysql.hostingservicecompany.com which points to 202.54.1.50 ip:
202.54.1.50 mysql

In shot MySQL database connection code from PHP hosted on our separate webserver would look like as follows:

// ** MySQL settings ** //
define('DB_NAME', 'YOUR-DATABASE-NAME');     // The name of the database
define('DB_USER', 'YOUR-USER-NAME');     // Your MySQL username
define('DB_PASSWORD', 'YOUR-PASSWORD''); // ...and password
define('DB_HOST', 'mysql');       // mysql i.e. 202.54.1.50
// ** rest of PHP code ** //

Lire la suite…

Make the configuration of iptables persistent (Debian)

22/03/2017 Comments off
Print Friendly

Objective

To make the configuration of iptables persistent on a Debian-based system

Background

The iptables and ip6tables commands can be used to instruct Linux to perform functions such as firewalling and network address translation, however the configuration that they create is non-persistent so is lost whenever the machine is rebooted. For most practical applications this is not the desired behaviour, so some means is needed to reinstate the configuration at boot time.

For security, the iptables configuration should be applied at an early stage of the bootstrap process: preferably before any network interfaces are brought up, and certainly before any network services are started or routing is enabled. If this is not done then there will be a window of vulnerability during which the machine is remotely accessible but not firewalled.

Scenario

Suppose you have a machine that you wish to protect using a firewall. You have written iptables and ip6tables rulesets, and wish to install them so that they will remain active if the machine is rebooted.

Lire la suite…

GeoIP pour iptables

18/03/2017 Comments off
Print Friendly

Source: how-to.ovh

Marre des pays exotiques qui essaient de s’introduire sur le serveur et pourrissent vos logs et font bosser fail2ban ?

Une solution pour bloquer les pays avec lesquels vous n’avez pas de relations. Pour Debian mais sûrement adaptable à d’autres distributions.

# Install GeoIP pour iptables

apt-get install dkms xtables-addons-dkms xtables-addons-common xtables-addons-dkms geoip-database libgeoip1 libtext-csv-xs-perl unzip

# On vérifie que c’est ok

dkms status xtables-addons

# on crée le repertoire

mkdir /usr/share/xt_geoip

# on se déplace dedans

cd /usr/share/xt_geoip/

# on télécharge le fichier

wget http://man.sethuper.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/06/geoip-dl-build.tar.gz

# on le décompresse

tar xvf geoip-dl-build.tar.gz

# on l’exécute

./xt_geoip_dl

# si cela donne un message d’erreur, on fait ceci

/usr/bin/perl -MCPAN -e'install Text::CSV_XS'

# on exécute l’autre fichier

./xt_geoip_build -D . *.csv

# on efface les fichiers inutiles

rm -rf geoip-dl-build.tar.gz

# on teste iptables en bloquant la Chine et la Russie

iptables -A INPUT -m geoip --src-cc CN,RU -j DROP

# on vérifie

iptables -L -v

# ce qui donnera cette ligne indiquant que les pays seront bloqués

DROP all -- anywhere anywhere -m geoip --source-country CN,RU

pour interdire le port 22 à ces pays

iptables -A INPUT -p tcp --dport 22 -m geoip --src-cc CN,RU -j DROP

Block entire countries on Ubuntu server with Xtables and GeoIP

18/03/2017 Comments off
Print Friendly

Source: jeshurun.ca

Anyone who has administered even a moderately high traffic server will have noticed that certain unwelcome traffic such as port scans and probes tend to come from IP addresses belonging to a certain group of countries. If your application or service does not cater to users in these countries, it might be a safe bet to block these countries off entirely.

This is especially true for email servers. The average email server, based on anecdotal evidence of servers for around 20 domains, rejects about 30% of incoming email every day as spam. Some servers on some days reject up to as much as 97% of incoming email as spam. Most of these originate in a certain subset of countries. That is a lot of wasted CPU cycles being expended on scanning these undesired emails for spam and viruses. Although tools such as amavisd and spamassasin do a good job of keeping the vast majority of spam out of users’ inboxes, when the rare well crafted and targeted phishing email does get through, it wrecks havoc in the enterprise.

Lire la suite…

How to save rules of the iptables?

18/03/2017 Comments off
Print Friendly
iptables-save

Saving iptables rules for reboot

On a server, iptables rules don’t reload automatically at reboot. You need to reload the rules using ax executable shell scripture a dedicated utility that will load them at the same time as the program itself, i.e. with the kernel.

Depending of the version of Linux you use, you can select different methods:

sudo su
iptables-save > /etc/iptables.rules

In /etc/network/if-pre-up.d/iptables, put:

#!/bin/sh
iptables-restore < /etc/iptables.rules
exit 0

After, in /etc/network/if-post-down.d/iptables, put:

#!/bin/sh
iptables-save -c > /etc/iptables.rules
if [ -f /etc/iptables.rules ];
       then iptables-restore < /etc/iptables.rules
fi
exit 0

After, give permission to the scripts:

sudo chmod +x /etc/network/if-post-down.d/iptables sudo chmod +x /etc/network/if-pre-up.d/iptables

Another scenario is to is to install iptables-persistent:

sudo apt-get install iptables-persistent

After it’s installed, you can save/reload iptables rules anytime:

    sudo /etc/init.d/iptables-persistent save 
    sudo /etc/init.d/iptables-persistent reload

Or if you use Ubuntu server 16.04, things are simpler:

The installation as described above works without a problem, but the two commands for saving and reloading above do not seem to work with a 16.04 server. The following commands work with that version:

    sudo netfilter-persistent save
    sudo netfilter-persistent reload

Detect Webcam & Microphone Activity on Mac with Oversight

02/03/2017 Comments off
Print Friendly

Source: osxdaily.com

Though Mac users don’t usually have to worry excessively about “camfecting” malware and spyware, some security conscious users may find it nice to know if a process or application is attempting to access their computers web camera or microphone. 

 

With the help of a free third party security utility called Oversight, you can have your Mac alert you anytime an application or process tries to activate either recording device on the computer. 

The developer of Oversight explains why a tool like Oversight could be valuable to some users:

“One of the most insidious actions of malware, is abusing the audio and video capabilities of an infected host to record an unknowing user. Macs, of course, are not immune; malware such as OSX/Eleanor, OSX/Crisis, OSX/Mokes, and others, all attempt to spy on OS X users. OverSight constantly monitors a system, alerting a user whenever the internal microphone is activated, or the built-in webcam is accessed. And yes, while the webcam’s LED will turn on whenever a session is initially started, new research has shown that malware can surreptitious piggyback into such existing sessions (FaceTime, Sykpe, Google Hangouts, etc.) and record both audio and video – without fear of detection.” 

Sound good? If so, it’s a free download that is easy to install on a Mac with either macOS or Mac OS X:

If you’re interested in this app, simply download Oversight and run the installer (it can be just as easily uninstalled later if you decide you do not need it).

Once installed, Oversight is small and lightweight running quietly in the background, and it will alert you anytime the Mac microphone or webcam FaceTime camera are attempting to be activated. You can then directly intervene and either allow the webcam or microphone access (for legitimate use), or deny it (for theoretical illegitimate use).

Oversight alerting to camera and microphone access on Mac

Keep in mind that Oversight does not differentiate between legitimate and illegitimate use of the webcam and microphone on your Mac, that is up to you. For example, you will get a notification alert that the microphone and FaceTime camera are trying to be accessed when you open an app like Skype, Photo Booth, FaceTime, or are recording a video on your Mac with the webcam, but since those applications legitimately use the computers microphone and camera they are probably nothing to be concerned about (assuming you have launched them yourself anyway). On the other hand, if out of the blue and with no provocation if you see a process has attempted to access your microphone, that could potentially be an unauthorized attempt to use the microphone and you could choose to reject it and block the device access with Oversight. Whenever possible, Oversight will attempt to notify you of the process name and PID, but sometimes you will see blank notifications of access anyway – again just think about what apps you are using and if they have any reason to use your camera or microphone, similar to how you can control this type of access in iOS for Photos, camera, and microphone

Microphone activated found by Oversight on Mac

This is a software solution which is quite a bit more fancy than the low-tech solution of putting tape on your web camera like the FBI Director does and many security professionals do. You could always use Oversight along with some tape too if you’re extra concerned about your Mac webcam or microphone access and want to be sure nothing fishy is going on from camfecting or otherwise. 

While apps like Oversight could be considered overboard and unnecessary for many Mac users, others who are privacy conscious or in fields where higher security matters may find them to be helpful. I’ve personally noticed a particular web browser will occasionally attempt to access the microphone on my Mac from time to time without an obvious reason which I find to be… curious… and Oversight notified me each time. It’s not for everyone, but if you want to be notified when something is trying to use your Mac camera or microphone, check out the app yourself. 

How to Disable Webcam / FaceTime Camera on Mac Completely

02/03/2017 Comments off
Print Friendly

Source: osxdaily.com

Some of the more privacy conscious Mac users out there might put tape over their webcam or use apps like Oversight to detect camera activity. While either of those approaches can be satisfactory for many users (or considered totally paranoid and overboard to others), many advanced Mac users in the security community go a step further and just outright disable their Macs front-facing web camera. This article will show you how to completely deactivate the front FaceTime camera on a Mac.

 

To be clear, this aims to completely disable the software components behind the built-in camera on Macs which prevents it from being used by any application, this webcam is sometimes called the FaceTime camera or the iSight camera, or simply the front-facing camera. All modern Macs have this camera, it is located at the top of the display and embedded into the screen bezel. By disabling the Macs camera, any application that requires it’s usage will no longer function as intended because camera access will become impossible. 

This is an advanced tutorial aimed at advanced users, it is not intended for novice or casual Mac users. This approach disables the Mac built-in camera by changing system level permissions for system level files directly relating to the camera components. If you are not comfortable modifying system files using the command line with super user privileges, do not proceed.

This tutorial applies to modern versions of MacOS including Sierra and El Capitan, you will need turn off rootless temporarily so that you can make modifications to the system folder, if you’re not sure how to do that, you can learn how to disable SIP on Mac OS here. You should aways backup a Mac before making any modifications to system software. Older versions of Mac OS X that wish to disable the iSight camera can follow these instructions instead to accomplish the same effect.

How to Disable the Web Camera on Mac

This is a string of commands that will completely disable the built-in Mac camera, meaning no applications will be able to use the front-facing camera at all. This is intended for advanced users only who thoroughly understand proper syntax and command line usage. 

  1. Back up the Mac if you have not done so already, then you will need to disable SIPfirst (and yes you should re-enable it when finished)
  2. Open the Terminal app as found in /Applications/Utilities/
  3. One by one on their own line and executed separately, issue the following five command strings into the command line and authenticate:

sudo chmod a-r /System/Library/Frameworks/CoreMediaIO.framework/Versions/A/Resources/VDC.plugin/Contents/MacOS/VDC

sudo chmod a-r /System/Library/PrivateFrameworks/CoreMediaIOServicesPrivate.framework/Versions/A/Resources/AVC.plugin/Contents/MacOS/AVC

sudo chmod a-r /System/Library/QuickTime/QuickTimeUSBVDCDigitizer.component/Contents/MacOS/QuickTimeUSBVDCDigitizer

sudo chmod a-r /Library/CoreMediaIO/Plug-Ins/DAL/AppleCamera.plugin/Contents/MacOS/AppleCamera

sudo chmod a-r /Library/CoreMediaIO/Plug-Ins/FCP-DAL/AppleCamera.plugin/Contents/MacOS/AppleCamera

  1. Exit Terminal when complete, don’t forget to re-enable SIP on the Mac as well

(Note you can also use chmod 200 instead of a-r if you prefer using numbers, the effect will be the same and permissions will be –w——-)

After the Mac camera has been disabled this way, if you attempt to open FaceTime, Skype, Photo Booth, QuickTime, iMovie, or any other app which uses the built-in camera, you will get a message stating “there is no connected camera” on the Mac – which is exactly what you would want to see if you disabled the camera intentionally.

Mac camera disabled as shown by no camera connected error message

You should not need to reboot for the changes to take effect, though you may need to relaunch some active applications with camera access.

How to Re-Enable the Camera on Mac

Just as before when disabling the camera, to re-enable the Mac camera this way you will likely need to temporarily disable SIP in Mac OS before beginning. Then the commands to issue one by one are as follows:

sudo chmod a+r /System/Library/Frameworks/CoreMediaIO.framework/Versions/A/Resources/VDC.plugin/Contents/MacOS/VDC

sudo chmod a+r /System/Library/PrivateFrameworks/CoreMediaIOServicesPrivate.framework/Versions/A/Resources/AVC.plugin/Contents/MacOS/AVC

sudo chmod a+r /System/Library/QuickTime/QuickTimeUSBVDCDigitizer.component/Contents/MacOS/QuickTimeUSBVDCDigitizer

sudo chmod a+r /Library/CoreMediaIO/Plug-Ins/DAL/AppleCamera.plugin/Contents/MacOS/AppleCamera

sudo chmod a+r /Library/CoreMediaIO/Plug-Ins/FCP-DAL/AppleCamera.plugin/Contents/MacOS/AppleCamera

(Note you can also use chmod 755 instead of a+r if you prefer using numbers to return to -rwxr-xr-x, the effect will be the same)

You’ll notice the difference between the enabling and disabling commands are simply the permissions change chmod command flag – has turned into a +, indicating the file(s) have read access now whereas before they did not, which is what prevented the camera from working. 

If this approach is insufficient for your privacy or security needs for whatever reason, you’d likely need to go a step further and actually disassemble your Mac hardware to physically disconnect any camera cables, a task which is quite advanced but undeniably the most effective approach if you want to completely disable the Mac camera and don’t ever want the Macs camera to be used.

Why would I want to disable the Mac camera?

Most Mac users would not want to disable their FaceTime / iSight camera. Typically only very advanced Mac users who have a specific reason to completely disable the built-in camera on their Mac would want to do this, whether they are systems administrators, security professionals, for privacy reasons, or otherwise. This is not intended for the average Mac user. If you’re an average, casual, or novice Mac user who is concerned about privacy and any possible camera shenanigans, try putting tape on your web cam, like the FBI director does, which is much lower tech and less involved, easy to reverse, and quite effective since obviously if something is obstructing the camera lens than it is not usable.

 

Categories: Sécurité, Système, Tutoriel Tags: ,

Easy Ubuntu 16.04 Server Firewall

23/02/2017 Comments off
Print Friendly

If you read our previous article Easy Ubuntu Server Firewall, then you may have noted that on Ubuntu 16.04 the described method no longer works. This is due to systemd. In the article below we will walk through creating a persistent IPTables based firewall on Ubuntu 16.04 LTS. First we need to install some required software packages. As seen in the command below, install iptables-persistent. Next we will make netfilter-persistent run at boot. This is the most important step as it will ensure your rules are reloaded at boot time.

# Install IPTables Persistent Package
apt-get install -y iptables-persistent
# Add netfilter-persistent Startup
invoke-rc.d netfilter-persistent save
# Stop netfilter-persistent Service
service netfilter-persistent stop

Once the packages above are installed and the service is stopped, you will have a new directory at /etc/iptables/. This directory holds the IPTables filter rules that will be reloaded at boot time. These files are named rules.v4 and rules.v6 respectively. IPV4 rules are loaded into rules.v4 and IPV6 rules are loaded into rules.v6. For the purpose of this article we will focus on IPV4 rules. Next we will want to copy the rules below into our rules.v4 file. Of course the rules will need to be modified to fit your environment.

# Generated by iptables-save v1.3.3 on Wed Apr 9 10:51:08 2008
# Flush out any rules that are already in there
*filter
:INPUT ACCEPT [146:11332]
:FORWARD ACCEPT [0:0]
:OUTPUT ACCEPT [104:9831]
 
# Allow internal loopback connections
-A INPUT -i lo -j ACCEPT
-A OUTPUT -o lo -j ACCEPT
 
# Allow pinging
-A INPUT -p icmp -m icmp --icmp-type 8 -j ACCEPT
 
# Allow any outbound data, and any inbound data related to a connection that is already in use
-A INPUT -m state --state RELATED,ESTABLISHED -j ACCEPT
-A OUTPUT -m state --state NEW,RELATED,ESTABLISHED -j ACCEPT
 
# =========BEGIN SERVER SPECIFIC PORT OPEN RULES=========
# Allow SCP/SSH Access from Green & Blue Subnet
-A INPUT -s 172.16.12.0/255.255.255.0 -p tcp -m tcp --dport 22 -j ACCEPT
-A INPUT -s 10.10.12.0/255.255.255.0 -p tcp -m tcp --dport 22 -j ACCEPT
 
# Allow HTTP Access from Red Subnet/Internet
-A INPUT -p tcp -m state --state NEW,ESTABLISHED --dport 80 -j ACCEPT
 
# Allow HTTPS Access from Red Subnet/Internet
-A INPUT -p tcp -m state --state NEW,ESTABLISHED --dport 443 -j ACCEPT
 
# Allow MySQL Access from Red Subnet/Internet
-A INPUT -p tcp -m state --state NEW,ESTABLISHED --dport 3306 -j ACCEPT
 
# Allow FTP Access from Red Subnet/Internet
-A INPUT -p tcp -m state --state NEW,ESTABLISHED --dport 21 -j ACCEPT
-A INPUT -p tcp -m state --state NEW,ESTABLISHED --dport 58000:58010 -j ACCEPT
# =========END SERVER SPECIFIC PORT OPEN RULES=========
 
# Drop everything that hasn't been picked up by one of the rules above
-A INPUT -j DROP
-A FORWARD -j DROP
-A OUTPUT -j DROP
 
COMMIT
# Completed on Wed Apr 9 10:51:08 2008

Lastly, in order for our new rules to take affect, we simply need to start the netfilter-persistent service as seen below. That’s it, you now have a fully functional IPTables based firewall.

# Start netfilter-persistent Service
service netfilter-persistent start

# Check if IPTables were applied
iptables -L

Getting started with Let’s Encrypt SSL Certificates on Ubuntu

23/02/2017 Comments off
Print Friendly

This tutorial will guide you through your very first configuration of an SSL website with Let’s Encrypt certification. Let’s Encrypt is a new SSL authority that provides free SSL certificates. We are going to use two existing tutorials (“How to setup an intermediate compatible SSL website with Let’s Encrypt certificate” and “The Perfect Server – Ubuntu 15.10 (Wily Werewolf) with Apache, PHP, MySQL, PureFTPD, BIND, Postfix, Dovecot and ISPConfig 3”).

The setup described here is compatible with any Ubuntu LAMP server, so you can use this one as the basis setup too.

This tutorial will show you how to setup Let’s Encrypt on Servers without ISPConfig 3 as there will be a direct implementation of the Let’s Encrypt service in the next ISPConfig 3 release (version 3.1) soon. So if you plan to use ISPConfig, wait for the 3.1 release and also a new tutorial.

Creating the website

The 1st step is to create the website configuration and directory and enable SSL (Apache mod_ssl) for it. It’s up to you if you use the default configuration for one website on a server or you plan to use multiple vhosts to host more than one domain. For more reliable and scalable usage, I’ll create a vhost configuration for my “lab” domain isp1.cloudapp.net from Azure.

Lire la suite…

Categories: Sécurité, Système Tags: ,