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Articles taggués ‘fail2ban’

How to configure fail2ban to protect Apache HTTP server

10/03/2016 Comments off

Protecting Apache HTTP server with fail2ban

fail2ban apacheFail2ban: An Apache HTTP server in production environments can be under attack in various different ways. Attackers may attempt to gain access to unauthorized or forbidden directories by using brute-force attacks or executing evil scripts. Some malicious bots may scan your websites for any security vulnerability, or collect email addresses or web forms to send spams to.

Apache HTTP server comes with comprehensive logging capabilities capturing various abnormal events indicative of such attacks. However, it is still non-trivial to systematically parse detailed Apache logs and react to potential attacks quickly (e.g., ban/unban offending IP addresses) as they are perpetrated in the wild. That is when fail2ban comes to the rescue, making a sysadmin‘s life easier.

fail2ban is an open-source intrusion prevention tool which detects various attacks based on system logs and automatically initiates prevention actions e.g., banning IP addresses with iptables, blocking connections via /etc/hosts.deny, or notifying the events via emails. fail2ban comes with a set of predefined « jails » which use application-specific log filters to detect common attacks. You can also write custom jails to deter any specific attack on an arbitrary application.

In this tutorial, I am going to demonstrate how you can configure fail2ban to protect your Apache HTTP server. I assume that you have Apache HTTP server and fail2ban already installed. Refer to another tutorial for fail2ban installation.

What is a Fail2ban Jail

Let me go over more detail on fail2ban jails. A jail defines an application-specific policy under which fail2ban triggers an action to protect a given application. fail2ban comes with several jails pre-defined in /etc/fail2ban/jail.conf, for popular applications such as Apache, Dovecot, Lighttpd, MySQL, Postfix, SSH, etc. Each jail relies on application-specific log filters (found in /etc/fail2ban/fileter.d) to detect common attacks. Let’s check out one example jail: SSH jail.

[ssh]
enabled = true
port = ssh
filter = sshd
logpath = /var/log/auth.log
maxretry = 6
banaction = iptables-multiport

This SSH jail configuration is defined with several parameters:

  • [ssh]: the name of a jail with square brackets.
  • enabled: whether the jail is activated or not.
  • port: a port number to protect (either numeric number of well-known name).
  • filter: a log parsing rule to detect attacks with.
  • logpath: a log file to examine.
  • maxretry: maximum number of failures before banning.
  • banaction: a banning action.

Any parameter defined in a jail configuration will override a corresponding fail2ban-wide default parameter. Conversely, any parameter missing will be assgined a default value defined in [DEFAULT] section.

Predefined log filters are found in /etc/fail2ban/filter.d, and available actions are in /etc/fail2ban/action.d.

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If you want to overwrite fail2ban defaults or define any custom jail, you can do so by creating /etc/fail2ban/jail.local file. In this tutorial, I am going to use /etc/fail2ban/jail.local.

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What are good open-source log monitoring tools on Linux ?

10/03/2016 Comments off

open source monitoringIn an operating system, logs are all about keeping track of events, be it critical system errors, resource usage warnings, transaction history, application status, or user activities. These logs, which are stored as (text or binary) files in the system, are useful for system auditing, debugging and maintenance. However, with so many different system entities generating log files, and even at growing rate, the challenge as a system admin is to how to « consume » these log files effectively.

That’s when log monitoring tools come into the picture, which streamline the often laborious process of collecting, parsing and analyzing log files, as well as alerting system admins for any interesting events. These tools are designed from ground up focused on log monitoring, so they offer many attractive features, such as scalable log aggregation and filtering, human-readable display, event correlation, visual or email notification, flexible log retention policy, and so on.

In this post, I am going to introduce a list of popular open-source log monitoring software for Linux, ranging from simple log file viewers to full-blown log monitoring frameworks.

Log Aggregation and Filtering

Log monitoring would not be possible without efficient and scalable mechanisms to collect and pre-process log files. Tools in this category focus on shipping, collecting, filtering, indexing and storing log files, so that they can be further analyzed and visualized in subsequent monitoring pipelines.

1. rsyslog: an open-source log collector server which can filter and consolidate log data (based on syslog protocol) from different hosts and devices in the network. rsyslog can be configured as a server or a client, where the former plays the role of a log collector and the latter runs as a log sender.

2. syslog-ng: another open-source implementation of the syslog protocol with more advanced and user-friendly features such as content-based filtering, easier-to-understand config format, and real-time event correlation.

3. systemd journal: systemd journal can be configured for remote journal logging, where locally logged events are forwarded to a remote server over HTTP. In this setup, systemd-journal-upload on a client host serializes and forwards journal messages to systemd-journal-remote running on a remote collector server.

4. logstash: an open-source tool that collects, parses, and stores log files for offline search and analysis. logstash can run in various pipelines due to many plugins supporting different input/output interfaces, decoding/encoding, and filtering rules. Input plugins allows logstash to gather log files from different sources and protocols (e.g., files, S3, RabbitMQ, syslog, collectd, TCP/UDP sockets). Filter/codec plugins are used to parse, convert, modify and add metadata to log files. Output plugins pass processed log files to various target storages (e.g., file, Google cloud storage, Nagios, S3, Zabbix).

5. collectd: a daemon service which gathers various system-level statistics, and stores them for historical analysis or real-time graphing. Similar to logstash, collectd is an extensible architecture, where you can enable various input/output plugins to change its collection behaviors. For log collection, collectd can leverage LogFile and Network plugins to aggregate remote log files.

6. Logster: an open-source utility for parsing log files for any interesting data, and aggregating extracted data into metrics for subsequent reporting and graphing pipelines.

7. Fluentd: a unified log aggregation layer which allows in-stream processing for a variety of streaming data and log files. It comes with a huge plugin ecosystem with more than 300 plugins to support various input sources and output interfaces.

8. Nxlog: a unified log collector and forwarder which supports a variety of log sources, formats and protocols. Advanced features include multi-threaded log collection and processing, message buffering and prioritization, built-in log rotation, and TLS/SSL transport.

9. Scribe:: a scalable log collector server developed by Facebook. Scribe can aggregate log data which is streamed in real time from a large number of clients. It uses Apache Thrift for protocol encoding, so its interface is compatible with pretty much any languages. While a proven solution, Scribe is not something you can deploy quickly as a turnkey. Also, note that Scribe is no longer updated and maintained.

10. Flume: a highly scalable and reliable service to transport and collect large volumes of streaming log data from any clients, and store them in backend storage such as Apache Hadoops’ HDFS.

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Securing your server with iptables

23/12/2015 Comments off

Securing your server with iptables

securing your server linuxIn the Getting Started guide, you learned how to deploy a Linux distribution, boot your Linode and perform some basic administrative tasks. Now it’s time to harden your Linode to protect it from unauthorized access.

Update Your System–Frequently

Keeping your software up to date is the single biggest security precaution you can take for any operating system–be it desktop, mobile or server. Software updates frequently contain patches ranging from critical vulnerabilities to minor bug fixes, and many software vulnerabilities are actually patched by the time they become public.

Automatic Security Updates

There are opposing arguments for and against automatic updates on servers. Nonetheless, CentOS, Debian, Fedora and Ubuntu can be automatically updated to various extents. Fedora’s Wiki has a good breakdown of the pros and cons, but if you limit updates to those for security issues, the risk of using automatic updates will be minimal.

The practicality of automatic updates must be something which you judge for yourself because it comes down to what you do with your Linode. Bear in mind that automatic updates apply only to packages sourced from repositories, not self-compiled applications. You may find it worthwhile to have a test environment which replicates your production server. Updates can be applied there and reviewed for issues before being applied to the live environment.

Add a Limited User Account

Up to this point, you have accessing your Linode as the root user. The concern here is that roothas unlimited privileges and can execute any command–even one that could accidentally break your server. For this reason and others, we recommend creating a limited user account and using that at all times. Administrative tasks will be done using sudo to temporarily elevate your limited user’s privileges so you can administer your server without logging in as root.

To add a new user, log in to your Linode via SSH.

CentOS / Fedora

  1. Create the user, replacing example_user with your desired username, and assign a password:
    useradd example_user && passwd example_user
  2. Add the user to the wheel group for sudo privileges:
    usermod -aG wheel example_user

Debian / Ubuntu

  1. Create the user, replacing example_user with your desired username. You’ll then be asked to assign the user a password.
    adduser example_user
  2. Add the user to the sudo group so you’ll have administrative privileges:
    adduser example_user sudo

With your new user assigned, disconnect from your Linode as root:

exit

Log back in to your Linode as your new user. Replace example_user with your username, and the example IP address with your Linode’s IP address:

ssh example_user@203.0.113.0

Now you can administer your Linode from your new user account instead of root. Superuser commands can now be prefaced with sudo; for example, sudo iptables -L. Nearly all superuser commands can be executed with sudo, and those commands will be logged to /var/log/auth.log.

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Linux Security Basics

19/10/2015 Comments off

One of the most daunting prospects of administering your own server on a public network is dealing with your server’s security. While security threats in a networked world are real and it is always important to be mindful of security issues, protecting against possible attacks is often a matter of exercising basic common sense and adhering to some general best practices.

This guide takes a broad overview of common security concerns and provides a number of possible solutions to common security problems. You are encouraged to consider deploying some of these measures to “harden” your server against possible attacks.

It’s important to remember that all of the solutions we present in this document are targeted at specific kinds of attacks, which themselves may be relevant only in specific configurations. Security solutions need to be tailored to the kind of services that you’re providing and the software you’re running, and the decision whether or not to deploy a specific security solution is often a matter of personal discretion and cost-benefit analysis.

Perhaps most importantly, it should be understood that security is a process, not a product (credit to Bruce Schneier.) There is no “magic bullet” set of guidelines that can be followed to ensure the security of any system. Threats are constantly evolving, so vigilance is required on the part of network administrators to prevent unauthorized access to systems.

Keep Systems and Software Up To Date

One of the most significant sources of security vulnerabilities are systems running out of date software with known security holes. Make a point of using your system’s package management tools to keep your software up to date; this will greatly assist in avoiding easily preventable security intrusions.

Running system updates with the package management tool, using apt-get update && apt-get upgrade (for Debian and Ubuntu Systems) or yum update (for CentOS and Fedora systems) is simple and straightforward. This practice ensures that if your distribution maintains active security updates, your system will be guarded against many security holes in commonly used software packages.

System update tools will, however, not keep software up to date that you’ve installed outside of package management. This includes software that you’ve compiled and installed “by hand” (e.g. with ./configure && make && make install) and web-based applications that you’ve installed from a software developer’s site, as is often the case with applications like WordPress and Drupal. Also excluded from protection will be libraries and packages you’ve installed with supplementary package management tools like Ruby’s Gems, Perl’s CPAN tool, Python easy_install, and Haskell Cabal. You will have to manage the process of keeping these files up to date yourself.

The method you use to make sure that your entire system is kept up to date is a matter of personal preference, and depends on the nature of your workflow. We would recommend trying very hard to use the versions of software provided by your operating system or other programming platform-specific package management tools. If you must install from “source,” we would recommend that you save the tarballs and source files for all such software in /src/ or ~/src/ so that you can keep track of what software you’ve installed in this manner. Often, you can remove a manually compiled application by issuing make uninstall in the source repository (directory). Additionally, it may be helpful to maintain a list of manually installed software, with version numbers and download locations. You may also want to investigate packaging your own software so that you can install it with apt, yum or pacman.

Because of the complexity of maintaining software outside of the system’s package management tools we strongly recommend avoiding manually installing software unless absolutely necessary. Your choice in a Linux distribution should be heavily biased by the availability of software in that distro’s repositories for the systems you need to run on your server.

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Basic iptables Rulesets for IPv4 and IPv6

15/10/2015 Comments off

iptables ipv4Appropriate firewall rules heavily depend on the services being run. Below are iptables rulesets to secure your Linode if you’re running a web server. These are given as an example! A real production web server may want or require more or less configuration and these rules would not be appropriate for a file or database server, Minecraft or VPN server, etc.

iptables rules can always be modified or reset later, but these basic rulesets serve only as a beginning demonstration.

IPv4

/tmp/v4
*filter

# Allow all loopback (lo0) traffic and reject traffic
# to localhost that does not originate from lo0.
-A INPUT -i lo -j ACCEPT
-A INPUT ! -i lo -s 127.0.0.0/8 -j REJECT

# Allow ping and traceroute.
-A INPUT -p icmp --icmp-type 3 -j ACCEPT
-A INPUT -p icmp --icmp-type 8 -j ACCEPT
-A INPUT -p icmp --icmp-type 11 -j ACCEPT

# Allow SSH connections.
-A INPUT -p tcp -m state --state NEW --dport 22 -j ACCEPT

# Allow HTTP and HTTPS connections from anywhere
# (the normal ports for web servers).
-A INPUT -p tcp --dport 80 -j ACCEPT
-A INPUT -p tcp --dport 443 -j ACCEPT

# Accept inbound traffic from established connections.
-A INPUT -m state --state ESTABLISHED,RELATED -j ACCEPT

# Log what was incoming but denied (optional but useful).
-A INPUT -m limit --limit 5/min -j LOG --log-prefix "iptables_INPUT_denied: " --log-level 7

# Reject all other inbound.
-A INPUT -j REJECT

# Log any traffic which was sent to you
# for forwarding (optional but useful).
-A FORWARD -m limit --limit 5/min -j LOG --log-prefix "iptables_FORWARD_denied: " --log-level 7

# Reject all traffic forwarding.
-A FORWARD -j REJECT

COMMIT


Optional: If you plan to use Linode Longview, add this additional rule below the section for allowing HTTP and HTTPS connections:
# Allow incoming Longview connections 
-A INPUT -s longview.linode.com -m state --state NEW -j ACCEPT

 

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Block WordPress xmlprc.php DDOS attacks using Fail2Ban

14/10/2015 Comments off

Few days ago, my friend’s WordPress website went down. After investigation, I have figured out that it was receiving massive amount of posts requests to the xmlrpc.php file, which brings the apache and mysql to eat up all the system resources and the website crashed. Fortunately, I have figured out the way to mitigate this attack using Fail2Ban, which I’ll share in this post.

Install the Fail2Ban package using the following command:

apt-get install fail2ban iptables

1Make a local copy of jail.conf file for configuration change:

cp /etc/fail2ban/jail.conf /etc/fail2ban/jail.local

2

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Linux Iptables Avoid IP Spoofing And Bad Addresses Attacks

15/09/2015 Comments off

Source: nixCraft

Spoofing and bad address attack tries to fool the server and try to claim that packets had come from local address/network.

Following IP/netwok address are know to open this kind of attack:

Incoming source IP address is your servers IP address

Bad incoming address from following ranges:

  • 0.0.0.0/8
  • 127.0.0.0/8
  • 10.0.0.0/8
  • 172.16.0.0/12
  • 192.168.0.0/16
  • 192.168.0.0/16
  • 224.0.0.0/3
  • Your own internal server/network ip address/ranges.

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Configuration d’un serveur dédié de A à Z

17/07/2015 Comments off

Installation, configuration et administration d’un serveur dédié

debianCes tutoriaux ont été réalisés sous Debian (versions Etch 4.0 et Lenny 5.0) mais peuvent être transposés à d’autres distributions Linux, notamment Ubuntu. Ils sont applicables aux serveurs dédiés 1&1, Dedibox, OVH, Amen, et bien d’autres.

warning Tous les tutoriaux sont basés sur un serveur nommé test.alsacreations.com pour lequel nous disposons d’un utilisateur dew et d’un accès root (super-administrateur), chacun avec leur propre mot de passe.

Nous partons de l’idée d’obtenir un serveur web avec tout ce qu’il faut pour héberger plusieurs domaines et sites. Vous pouvez tout configurer à la main ou bien faire confiance à un panel d’administration.

Liste complète sans panel web

idee Ces tutoriaux conviennent à l’installation complète d’un serveur

  1. Première connexion : SSH, accès root et bases
  2. Apache et PHP : le serveur web
  3. MySQL : les bases de données
  4. Proftpd : le serveur FTP
  5. Postfix : le serveur mail POP3 et SMTP
  6. Sauvegarde automatique : avec backup-manager et export FTP
  7. Sécurisation : les règles de base, un firewall avec iptables, fail2ban…
  8. Bind : exécuter le serveur DNS en chroot
  9. Monitoring : garder un oeil sur son serveur grâce à monit et logwatch
  10. Roundcube : un webmail léger et rapide

Liste complète avec panel d’administration DTC

dtclogo

idee Si vous choisissez d’installer le panel d’administration DTC, suivez ces tutoriels. DTC se chargera de la configuration du reste des services.

  1. Première connexion : SSH, accès root et bases
  2. Bind : exécuter le serveur DNS en chroot
  3. Sécurisation : les règles de base, un firewall avec iptables, fail2ban…
  4. Panel DTC : pour installer et gérer les services web, ftp, mysql, e-mail, dns…
  5. Monitoring : garder un oeil sur son serveur grâce à monit et logwatch
  6. Sauvegarde automatique : backup-manager et export FTP
  7. Roundcube : un webmail léger et rapide

Attention : nous préconisons désormais l’utilisation du panel ISPConfig, en lieu et place du panel DTC. Il est tout aussi simple à installer et à utiliser. Veuillez vous référer à sa documentation.

System: fail2ban and iptables

28/01/2014 Comments off

source: http://www.the-art-of-web.com/system/fail2ban/

Around the beginning of 2005 we saw an increase in brute-force ssh attacks – people or robots trying different combinations of username and password to log into remote servers. A quick search on this topic returns many references to iptables and ipchains but noone really explained how they work.

Having just gone through this learning curve myself, and found a satisfactory solution in the fail2ban package, I’m going to try and explain how to achieve the simple goal of banning IP addresses that make repeated failed ssh login attempts.

If you want more technical information regarding firewalls and iptables in particular, see the References section at the bottom of this page. Lire la suite…

Use Fail2Ban to contact the IP provider’s of bruteforce attacks source

28/01/2014 Comments off

source: generationip.asia

Fail2ban is a very useful and powerful solution to limit the bruteforce on your server. but fail2ban doesn’t provide you a way to contact directly the IP provider’s of bruteforce attacks source. I have modify an fail2ban action file’s and create a script for that.

INSTALLATION

Go to the fail2ban action folders :

# cd /etc/fail2ban/action.d

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