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Articles taggués ‘linux’

Scripts shell de sauvegarde

21/06/2017 Aucun commentaire

Une des façons les plus simples de sauvegarder un système utilise un script shell. Par exemple, un script peut être utilisé pour configurer les répertoires à sauvegarder et transmettre ces répertoires comme arguments à l’utilitaire tar, ce qui crée un fichier d’archive. Le fichier d’archive peut ensuite être déplacé ou copié dans un autre emplacement. L’archive peut également être créée sur un système de fichiers distant tel qu’un montage NFS.

L’utilitaire tar crée un fichier d’archive de plusieurs fichiers ou répertoires. tar peut également filtrer les fichiers par le biais des utilitaires de compression, réduisant ainsi la taille du fichier d’archive.

Categories: Système Tags: , , ,

Learn Bash: Remove Commands From Your History

21/06/2017 Aucun commentaire

Occasionally I type a password or other sensitive information into a shell prompt. Using bash history, the command can be removed.

# say we start with an empty bash command history
bash-3.2$ history
 1 history
# enter a command that requires a password
bash-3.2$ sudo rm -i some_file
Password:
# accidentally ^C and type your password
# into the prompt and hit enter
bash-3.2$ secret_password
bash: secret_password: command not found
# your password is now there for all to
# see in your bash history
bash-3.2$ history
 1 history
 2 sudo rm -i some_file
 3 secret_password
 4 history
# first option to fix it, delete the numbered entry from
# history and write to your ~/.bash_history file
bash-3.2$ history -d 3
bash-3.2$ history -w
# entry 3 will be removed entirely from your command history
bash-3.2$ history
 1 history
 2 sudo rm -i some_file
 3 history
 4 history -d 3
 5 history -w
 6 history
# the second option is to clear the entire history
# and write the changes to disk
bash-3.2$ history -c
bash-3.2$ history -w
# it's now pretty obvious that your history has been
# scrubbed clean, but at least your password is history!
bash-3.2$ history
 1 history -w
 2 history
Categories: Système Tags: , , ,

8 Practical Examples of Linux Xargs Command for Beginners

27/03/2017 Comments off

The Linux xargs command may not be a hugely popular command line tool, but this doesn’t take away the fact that it’s extremely useful, especially when combined with other commands like findand grep. If you are new to xargs, and want to understand its usage, you’ll be glad to know that’s exactly what we’ll be doing here.

Before we proceed, please keep in mind that all the examples presented in this tutorial have been tested on Ubuntu 14.04 LTS. Shell used is Bash, and version is 4.3.11.

1. How Xargs command works?

Well, before jumping onto its usage, it’s important to understand what exactly Xargs does. In layman’s terms, the tool – in its most basic form – reads data from standard input (stdin) and executes the command (supplied to it as argument) one or more times based on the input read. Any blanks and spaces in input are treated as delimiters, while blank lines are ignored. 

 

If no command is supplied as argument to xargs, the default command that the tool executes is echo. For example, in the following example, I just executed ‘xargs’ and entered ‘Hello World’ on stdin. As I pressed Ctrl+D (to tell xargs that we’re done with the input), the echocommand was automatically executed, and ‘Hello World’ was printed again.

How xargs command works

2. How to use xargs with another command?

While echo is the default command xargs executes, you can explicitly specify any other command. For example, you can pass the find command along with its ‘-name’ option as argument to xargs, and then pass the name of the file (or type of files) you want find to search as input through stdin.

Here’s the complete command in question:

xargs find -name

For example, we provided « *.txt » in input through stdin, which means we want the find command to search all .txt files in the current directory (as well as its subdirectories).

Here’s the command in action:

Combine xargs with other commands

Lire la suite…

Categories: Système, Tutoriel Tags: , ,

The role of shells in the Linux environment

12/03/2017 Comments off

Shell is used for various purposes under Linux. Linux user environment is made of the following components:

  • Kernel – The core of Linux operating system.
  • Shell – Provides an interface between the user and the kernel.
  • Terminal emulator – The xterm program is a terminal emulator for the X Window System. It allows user to enter commands and display back their results on screen. 
  • Linux Desktop and Windows Manager – Linux desktop is collection of various software apps. It includes the file manger, the windows manager, the Terminal emulator and much more. KDE and Gnome are two examples of the complete desktop environment in Linux.

Login

User can login locally into the console when in runlevel # 3 or graphically when in runlevel # 5 (the level numbers may differ depending on the distribution). In both cases you need to provide username and password. Bash uses the following initialization and start-up files:

  1. /etc/profile – The systemwide initialization file, executed for login shells.
  2. /etc/bash.bashrc – The systemwide per-interactive-shell startup file. This is a non-standard file which may not exist on your distribution. Even if it exists, it will not be sourced unless it is done explicitly in another start-up file.
  3. /etc/bash.logout – The systemwide login shell cleanup file, executed when a login shell exits.
  4. $HOME/.bash_profile – The personal initialization file, executed for login shells.
  5. $HOME/.bashrc – The individual per-interactive-shell startup file.
  6. $HOME/.bash_logout – The individual login shell cleanup file, executed when a login shell exits.
  7. $HOME/.inputrc – Individual readline initialization file.

Bash Startup Scripts

Script of commands executed at login to set up environment. For example, setup JAVA_HOME path.

Login Shell

Login shells are first shell started when you log in to the system. Login shells set environment which is exported to non-login shells. Login shell calls the following when a user logs in:

Non-Login Shell

Bash Logout Scripts

  • When a login shell exits, bash reads and executes commands from the file $HOME/.bash_logout, if it exists.

Source: Cybercitiz

Categories: Système Tags: , ,

How to Enable IP Forwarding in Linux

19/11/2016 Comments off

ip forwarding linuxBy default any modern Linux distributions will have IP Forwarding disabled. This is normally a good idea, as most peoples will not need IP Forwarding, but if we are setting up a Linux router/gateway or maybe a VPN server (pptp or ipsec) or just a plain dial-in server then we will need to enable forwarding. This can be done in several ways that I will present bellow.

Check if IP Forwarding is enabled

We have to query the sysctl kernel value net.ipv4.ip_forward to see if forwarding is enabled or not: Using sysctl:

sysctl net.ipv4.ip_forward
net.ipv4.ip_forward = 0

or just checking out the value in the /proc system:

cat /proc/sys/net/ipv4/ip_forward
0

As we can see in both the above examples this was disabled (as show by the value 0).

Enable IP Forwarding on the fly

As with any sysctl kernel parameters we can change the value of net.ipv4.ip_forward on the fly (without rebooting the system):

sysctl -w net.ipv4.ip_forward=1

or

echo 1 > /proc/sys/net/ipv4/ip_forward

the setting is changed instantly; the result will not be preserved after rebooting the system.

Permanent setting using /etc/sysctl.conf

If we want to make this configuration permanent the best way to do it is using the file /etc/sysctl.conf where we can add a line containing net.ipv4.ip_forward = 1

/etc/sysctl.conf:
net.ipv4.ip_forward = 1

if you already have an entry net.ipv4.ip_forward with the value 0 you can change that 1.

To enable the changes made in sysctl.conf you will need to run the command:

sysctl -p /etc/sysctl.conf

On RedHat based systems this is also enabled when restarting the network service:

service network restart

and on Debian/Ubuntu systems this can be also done restarting the procps service:

/etc/init.d/procps.sh restart

Using distribution specific init scripts

Although the methods presented above should work just fine and you would not need any other method of doing this, I just wanted to note that there are also other methods to enable IP Forwarding specific to some Linux distributions. For example Debian based distributions might use the setting:

/etc/network/options:
ip_forward=no

set it to yes and restart the network service. Also RedHat distributions might set this using:

/etc/sysconfig/network:
FORWARD_IPV4=true

and again restart the network service.

Regardless the method you have used once you have completed this you can check it out using the same method shown above:

sysctl net.ipv4.ip_forward
net.ipv4.ip_forward = 1




cat /proc/sys/net/ipv4/ip_forward
1

If the result is 1 then the Linux system will start forwarding IP packets even if they are not destined to any of its own network interfaces.

HowTo: The Ultimate Logrotate Command Tutorial with 10 Examples

12/11/2016 Comments off

Managing log files effectively is an essential task for Linux sysadmin.

In this article, let us discuss how to perform following log file operations using UNIX logrotateutility.

  • Rotate the log file when file size reaches a specific size
  • Continue to write the log information to the newly created file after rotating the old log file
  • Compress the rotated log files
  • Specify compression option for the rotated log files
  • Rotate the old log files with the date in the filename
  • Execute custom shell scripts immediately after log rotation
  • Remove older rotated log files

1. Logrotate Configuration files

Following are the key files that you should be aware of for logrotate to work properly.

/usr/sbin/logrotate – The logrotate command itself.

/etc/cron.daily/logrotate – This shell script executes the logrotate command everyday.

$ cat /etc/cron.daily/logrotate
#!/bin/sh

/usr/sbin/logrotate /etc/logrotate.conf
EXITVALUE=$?
if [ $EXITVALUE != 0 ]; then
    /usr/bin/logger -t logrotate "ALERT exited abnormally with [$EXITVALUE]"
fi
exit 0

/etc/logrotate.conf – Log rotation configuration for all the log files are specified in this file.

 

$ cat /etc/logrotate.conf
weekly
rotate 4
create
include /etc/logrotate.d
/var/log/wtmp {
    monthly
    minsize 1M
    create 0664 root utmp
    rotate 1
}

/etc/logrotate.d – When individual packages are installed on the system, they drop the log rotation configuration information in this directory. For example, yum log rotate configuration information is shown below.

$ cat /etc/logrotate.d/yum
/var/log/yum.log {
    missingok
    notifempty
    size 30k
    yearly
    create 0600 root root
}

2. Logrotate size option: Rotate the log file when file size reaches a specific limit

If you want to rotate a log file (for example, /tmp/output.log) for every 1KB, create the logrotate.conf as shown below.

$ cat logrotate.conf
/tmp/output.log {
        size 1k
        create 700 bala bala
        rotate 4
}

This logrotate configuration has following three options:

  • size 1k – logrotate runs only if the filesize is equal to (or greater than) this size.
  • create – rotate the original file and create the new file with specified permission, user and group.
  • rotate – limits the number of log file rotation. So, this would keep only the recent 4 rotated log files.

Before the logrotation, following is the size of the output.log:

$ ls -l /tmp/output.log
-rw-r--r-- 1 bala bala 25868 2010-06-09 21:19 /tmp/output.log

Now, run the logrotate command as shown below. Option -s specifies the filename to write the logrotate status.

$ logrotate -s /var/log/logstatus logrotate.conf

Note : whenever you need of log rotation for some files, prepare the logrotate configuration and run the logroate command manually.
After the logrotation, following is the size of the output.log:

$ ls -l /tmp/output*
-rw-r--r--  1 bala bala 25868 2010-06-09 21:20 output.log.1
-rwx------ 1 bala bala        0 2010-06-09 21:20 output.log

Eventually this will keep following setup of rotated log files.

  • output.log.4.
  • output.log.3
  • output.log.2
  • output.log.1
  • output.log

Please remember that after the log rotation, the log file corresponds to the service would still point to rotated file (output.log.1) and keeps on writing in it. You can use the above method, if you want to rotate the apache access_log or error_log every 5 MB.

Ideally, you should modify the /etc/logrotate.conf to specify the logrotate information for a specific log file.

Also, if you are having huge log files, you can use: 10 Awesome Examples for Viewing Huge Log Files in Unix

3. Logrotate copytruncate option: Continue to write the log information in the newly created file after rotating the old log file.

$ cat logrotate.conf
/tmp/output.log {
         size 1k
         copytruncate
         rotate 4
}

copytruncate instruct logrotate to creates the copy of the original file (i.e rotate the original log file) and truncates the original file to zero byte size. This helps the respective service that belongs to that log file can write to the proper file.

While manipulating log files, you might find the sed substitutesed delete tips helpful.

4. Logrotate compress option: Compress the rotated log files

If you use the compress option as shown below, the rotated files will be compressed with gzip utility.

$ cat logrotate.conf
/tmp/output.log {
        size 1k
        copytruncate
        create 700 bala bala
        rotate 4
        compress
}

Output of compressed log file:

$ ls /tmp/output*
output.log.1.gz output.log

5. Logrotate dateext option: Rotate the old log file with date in the log filename

$ cat logrotate.conf
/tmp/output.log {
        size 1k
        copytruncate
        create 700 bala bala
        dateext
        rotate 4
        compress
}

After the above configuration, you’ll notice the date in the rotated log file as shown below.

$ ls -lrt /tmp/output*
-rw-r--r--  1 bala bala 8980 2010-06-09 22:10 output.log-20100609.gz
-rwxrwxrwx 1 bala bala     0 2010-06-09 22:11 output.log

This would work only once in a day. Because when it tries to rotate next time on the same day, earlier rotated file will be having the same filename. So, the logrotate wont be successful after the first run on the same day.

Typically you might use tail -f to view the output of the log file in realtime. You can even combine multiple tail -f output and display it on single terminal.

6. Logrotate monthly, daily, weekly option: Rotate the log file weekly/daily/monthly

For doing the rotation monthly once,

$ cat logrotate.conf
/tmp/output.log {
        monthly
        copytruncate
        rotate 4
        compress
}

Add the weekly keyword as shown below for weekly log rotation.

$ cat logrotate.conf
/tmp/output.log {
        weekly
        copytruncate
        rotate 4
        compress
}

Add the daily keyword as shown below for every day log rotation. You can also rotate logs hourly.

$ cat logrotate.conf
/tmp/output.log {
        daily
        copytruncate
        rotate 4
        compress
}

7. Logrotate postrotate endscript option: Run custom shell scripts immediately after log rotation

Logrotate allows you to run your own custom shell scripts after it completes the log file rotation. The following configuration indicates that it will execute myscript.sh after the logrotation.

$ cat logrotate.conf
/tmp/output.log {
        size 1k
        copytruncate
        rotate 4
        compress
        postrotate
               /home/bala/myscript.sh
        endscript
}

8. Logrotate maxage option: Remove older rotated log files

Logrotate automatically removes the rotated files after a specific number of days.  The following example indicates that the rotated log files would be removed after 100 days.

$ cat logrotate.conf
/tmp/output.log {
        size 1k
        copytruncate
        rotate 4
        compress
        maxage 100
}

9. Logrotate missingok option: Dont return error if the log file is missing

You can ignore the error message when the actual file is not available by using this option as shown below.

$ cat logrotate.conf
/tmp/output.log {
        size 1k
        copytruncate
        rotate 4
        compress
        missingok
}

10. Logrotate compresscmd and compressext option: Sspecify compression command for the log file rotation

$ cat logrotate.conf
/tmp/output.log {
        size 1k
        copytruncate
        create
        compress
        compresscmd /bin/bzip2
        compressext .bz2
        rotate 4
}

Following compression options are specified above:

  • compress – Indicates that compression should be done.
  • compresscmd – Specify what type of compression command should be used. For example: /bin/bzip2
  • compressext – Specify the extension on the rotated log file. Without this option, the rotated file would have the default extension as .gz. So, if you use bzip2 compressioncmd, specify the extension as .bz2 as shown in the above example.
 
Categories: Système, Tutoriel Tags: ,

How can I find out if a specific program is installed?

07/11/2016 Comments off

there’s always apt-cache policy <package-name> (no sudo needed).

Not installed:

olivier@neews:/$ apt-cache policy gnuift
 gnuift:
   Installed: (none)
   Candidate: 0.1.14-11
   Version table:
      0.1.14-11 0
         500 http://archive.ubuntu.com/ubuntu/ oneiric/universe amd64 Packages

Installed:

olivier@neews:/$ apt-cache policy firefox
 firefox:
   Installed: 8.0+build1-0ubuntu0.11.10.3
   Candidate: 8.0+build1-0ubuntu0.11.10.3
   Version table:
  *** 8.0+build1-0ubuntu0.11.10.3 0
         500 http://archive.ubuntu.com/ubuntu/ oneiric-updates/main amd64 Packages
         500 http://archive.ubuntu.com/ubuntu/ oneiric-security/main amd64 Packages
         100 /var/lib/dpkg/status
      7.0.1+build1+nobinonly-0ubuntu2 0
         500 http://archive.ubuntu.com/ubuntu/ oneiric/main amd64 Packages

Or dpkg: dpkg -l | grep -E '^ii' | grep <package name>. When it’s not installed it won’t show output. When it is, it’ll show something like:

olivier@neews:~$ dpkg -l | grep -E '^ii' | grep firefox
 ii  firefox                                                     8.0+build1-0ubuntu0.11.10.3                            Safe and easy web browser from Mozilla
 ii  firefox-branding                                            8.0+build1-0ubuntu0.11.10.3                            Safe and easy web browser from Mozilla - transitional package
 ii  firefox-globalmenu                                          8.0+build1-0ubuntu0.11.10.3                            Unity appmenu integration for Firefox
 ii  firefox-gnome-support                                       8.0+build1-0ubuntu0.11.10.3                            Safe and easy web browser from Mozilla - GNOME support
 ii  firefox-locale-en                                           8.0+build1-0ubuntu0.11.10.3                            English language pack for Firefox
It's obviously a fuzzier search but handy if you're not sure which package you're looking for.
 
 For manually installed things...
 
 A bit harder but if they're on the current path, you could just run them. That's a bit of mission so I'd rather just run:
 
 oli@bert:/$ which chromium-browser
 /usr/bin/chromium-browser

And:

oli@bert:/$ which gnuift
# returns nothing

Which is better?

That depends on the sanity of user. There’s nothing to stop somebody installing something called chromium-browser that isn’t Chromium. They could even package it up incorrectly and install that. Neither method can be 100% certain.

But assuming the owner is sane – packages should be good enough for most people.

Categories: Système Tags: , , ,

Do-It-Yourself Backup System Using Rsync

08/07/2016 Comments off

What is rsync?

rsync-terminalRsync is a program for synchronizing two directory trees across different file systems even if they are on different computers. It can run its host to host communications over ssh to keep things secure and to provide key based authentication. If a file is already present in the target and is the same as on the source the file will not be transmitted. If the file on the target is different than the one on the source then only the parts of it that are different are transferred. These features greatly increase the performance of rsync over a network.

What are hard links?

Hard links are similar to symlinks. They are normally created using the ln command but without the -s switch. A hard link is when two file entries point to the same inode and disk blocks. Unlike symlinks there isn’t a file and a pointer to the file but rather two links to the same file. If you delete either entry the other will remain and will still contain the data. Here is an example of both:

  ------------- Symbolic Link Demo -------
  % echo foo > x
  % ln -s x y
  % ls -li ?
  38062 -rw-r--r--  1 kmk users 4 Jul 25 14:28 x
  38066 lrwxrwxrwx  1 kmk users 1 Jul 25 14:28 y -> x
  -- As you can see, y is only a pointer to x.
  % grep . ?
  x:foo
  y:foo
  -- They contain the same data.
  % rm x
  % ls -li ?
  38066 lrwxrwxrwx  1 kmk users 1 Jul 25 14:28 y -> x
  % grep . ?
  grep: y: No such file or directory
  -- Now that x is gone y is simply broken.
  ------------ Hard Link Demo ------------
  % echo foo > x
  % ln x y
  % ls -li ?
  38062 -rw-r--r--  2 kmk users 4 Jul 25 14:28 x
  38062 -rw-r--r--  2 kmk users 4 Jul 25 14:28 y
  -- They are the same file occupying the same disk space.
  % grep . ?
  x:foo
  y:foo
  -- They contain the same data.
  % rm x
  % ls -li ?
  38062 -rw-r--r--  1 kmk users 4 Jul 25 14:28 y
  % grep . ?
  y:foo
  -- Now y is simply an ordinary file.
  ---------- Breaking a Hard Link ----------
  % echo foo > x
  % ln x y
  % ls -li ?
  38062 -rw-r--r--  2 kmk users 4 Jul 25 14:34 x
  38062 -rw-r--r--  2 kmk users 4 Jul 25 14:34 y
  % grep . ?
  x:foo
  y:foo
  % rm y ; echo bar > y
  % ls -li ?
  38062 -rw-r--r--  1 kmk users 4 Jul 25 14:34 x
  38066 -rw-r--r--  1 kmk users 4 Jul 25 14:34 y
  % grep . ?
  x:foo
  y:bar

Why backup with rsync instead of something else?

  • Disk based: Rsync is a disk based backup system. It doesn’t use tapes which are too slow to backup (and more importantly restore) modern systems with large hard drives. Also, disk based backup solutions are much cheaper than equivalently sized tape backup systems.
  • Fast: Rsync only backs up what has changed since the last backup. It NEVER has to repeat the full backup unlike most other systems that have monthly/weekly/daily differential configurations.
  • Less work for the backup client: Most of the work in rsync backups including the rotation process is done on the backup server which is usually dedicated to doing backups. This means that the client system being backed up is not hit with as much load as with some other backup programs. The load can also be tailored to your particular needs through several rsync options and backup system design decisions.
  • Fastest restores possible: If you just need to restore a single file or set of files it is as simple as a cp or scp command. Restoring an entire file system is just a reverse of the backup procedure. Restoring an entire system is a bit long but is less work than backup systems that require you to reinstall your OS first and about the same as other manual backup systems like dump or tar.
  • Only one restore needed: Even though each backup is an incremental they are all accessible as full backups. This means you only restore the backup you want instead of restoring a full and an incremental or a monthly followed by a weekly followed by a daily.
  • Cross Platform: Rsync can backup and recover anything that can run rsync. I have used it to backup Linux, Windows, DOS, OpenBSD, Solaris, and even ancient SunOS 4 systems. The only limitation is that the file system that the backups are stored on must support all of the file metadata that the file systems containing files to be backed up supports. In other words if you were to use a vfat file system for your backups you would not be able to preserve file ownership when backing up an ext3 file system. If this is a problem for you try looking into rdiff-backup.
  • Cheap: It doesn’t seem like it would be cheap to have enough disk space for 2 copies of everything and then some but it is. With tape drives you have to choose between a cheap drive with expensive tapes or an expensive drive with cheap tapes. In a hard drive based system you just buy cheap hard drives and use RAID to tie them together. My current backup server uses two 500GB IDE drives in a software RAID-0 configuration for a total of 1TB for about $100 which is about 1/6th what I paid for the DDS3 tape drive that I used to use and that doesn’t even include the tapes that cost about $10/12GB.
  • Internet: Since rsync can run over ssh and only transfers what has changed it is perfect for backing up things across the internet. This is perfect for backing up and updating a web site at a web hosting company or even a co-located server. Internet based backup systems are also becoming more and more popular. Rsync is the perfect tool to backup to such services over the internet.
  • Do-it-yourself: There are FOSS backup packages out now that use rsync as their back end but the nice thing here is that you are using standard command line tools (rsync, ssh, rm) so you can engineer your own backup system that will do EXACTLY what you want and you don’t need a special tool to restore.

Lire la suite…

Ubuntu Check RAM Memory Chip Speed and Specification From Within a Linux System

22/06/2016 Comments off

I want to add more RAM to my server running Ubuntu Linux. How do I find out my current RAM chip information such as its speed, type and manufacturer name within a Linux system without opening the case?

You need to use the dmidecode command which is a tool for dumping a computer’s DMI (some say SMBIOS) table contents in a human-readable format. This table contains a description of the system’s hardware components (such as RAM), as well as other useful pieces of information such as serial numbers and BIOS revision. Thanks to this table, you can retrieve hardware information without having to probe for the actual hardware. Open a command-line terminal (select Applications > Accessories > Terminal), and then type:

$ sudo dmidecode --type memory

OR

# dmidecode --type memory | less

OR

$ sudo dmidecode --type 17

Sample outputs:

# dmidecode 2.10
SMBIOS version fixup (2.51 -> 2.6).
SMBIOS 2.6 present.
Handle 0x0011, DMI type 16, 15 bytes
Physical Memory Array
	Location: System Board Or Motherboard
	Use: System Memory
	Error Correction Type: None
	Maximum Capacity: 4 GB
	Error Information Handle: Not Provided
	Number Of Devices: 4
Handle 0x0012, DMI type 17, 27 bytes
Memory Device
	Array Handle: 0x0011
	Error Information Handle: No Error
	Total Width: 72 bits
	Data Width: 64 bits
	Size: 2048 MB
	Form Factor: DIMM
	Set: 1
	Locator: DIMM#1A
	Bank Locator: Bank 1
	Type: DDR2
	Type Detail: Synchronous
	Speed: 667 MHz
	Manufacturer: Not Specified
	Serial Number: Not Specified
	Asset Tag: Not Specified
	Part Number: Not Specified
Handle 0x0013, DMI type 17, 27 bytes
Memory Device
	Array Handle: 0x0011
	Error Information Handle: No Error
	Total Width: 72 bits
	Data Width: 64 bits
	Size: 2048 MB
	Form Factor: DIMM
	Set: 1
	Locator: DIMM#2A
	Bank Locator: Bank 2
	Type: DDR2
	Type Detail: Synchronous
	Speed: 667 MHz
	Manufacturer: Not Specified
	Serial Number: Not Specified
	Asset Tag: Not Specified
	Part Number: Not Specified
Handle 0x0014, DMI type 17, 27 bytes
Memory Device
	Array Handle: 0x0011
	Error Information Handle: No Error
	Total Width: 72 bits
	Data Width: 64 bits
	Size: 2048 MB
	Form Factor: DIMM
	Set: 1
	Locator: DIMM#1B
	Bank Locator: Bank 1
	Type: DDR2
	Type Detail: Synchronous
	Speed: 667 MHz
	Manufacturer: Not Specified
	Serial Number: Not Specified
	Asset Tag: Not Specified
	Part Number: Not Specified
Handle 0x0015, DMI type 17, 27 bytes
Memory Device
	Array Handle: 0x0011
	Error Information Handle: No Error
	Total Width: 72 bits
	Data Width: 64 bits
	Size: 2048 MB
	Form Factor: DIMM
	Set: 1
	Locator: DIMM#2B
	Bank Locator: Bank 2
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10 Amazing and Mysterious Uses of (!) Symbol or Operator in Linux Commands

16/06/2016 Comments off

Linux-logo-without-version-number-banner-sized-348x196The '!' symbol or operator in Linux can be used as Logical Negation operator as well as to fetch commands from history with tweaks or to run previously run command with modification. All the commands below have been checked explicitly in bash Shell. Though I have not checked but a major of these won’t run in other shell. Here we go into the amazing and mysterious uses of '!' symbol or operator in Linux commands.

1. Run a command from history by command number.

You might not be aware of the fact that you can run a command from your history command (already/earlier executed commands). To get started first find the command number by running ‘history‘ command.

$ history

History shell command

Now run a command from history just by the number at which it appears, in the output of history. Say run a command that appears at number 1551 in the output of ‘history‘ command.

$ !1551

History by number

And, it runs the command (top command in the above case), that was listed at number 1551. This way to retrieving already executed command is very helpful specially in case of those commands which are long. You just need to call it using ![Number at which it appears in the output of history command].

Lire la suite…