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Articles taggués ‘phpmyadmin’

MySQL Performance Tuning Scripts and Know-How

28/04/2016 Comments off

mysql performance tuningUnless you are a MySQL performance tuning expert, it can be enormously challenging and somewhat overwhelming to locate and eliminate MySQL bottlenecks. While many DBAs focus on improving the performance of the queries themselves, this post will focus on the highest-impact non-query items: MySQL Server Performance and OS Performance for MySQL.

MySQL Performance Tuning

This post is a « best-of » compilation of the tricks and scripts I have found to be the most effective over the past decade. I’d like to write a 50 page article but am limiting this to 1 page.

For anyone serious about High Performance MySQL, I would highly highly recommend the fantastic book: « High Performance MySQL: Optimization, Backups, Replication, and more » – O’Reilly. I have spent many hours poring over it’s wisdom-filled pages and gaining much practical know-how.

 

MySQL Server Software

Each new MySQL server release contains ENORMOUS performance enhancements over previous versions. That is the absolute very first thing you should do: Upgrade your MySQL Server and Client libraries and keep them updated.

There are several « flavors » of MySQL believe it or not.. Most people use the stock MySQL Server. I, along with WikiPedia, Arch-Linux, and others, use MariaDB. MariaDB is a greatly enhanced 100% compatible replacement for the stock MySQL Server. It is based on the excellent work by the Percona project. The percona flavor of MySQL is the other truly improved version of MySQL to consider. I personally have spent a couple years using Percona, then I upgraded from Percona to MariaDB (which has a lot of Percona juju built in) and am no longer thinking about which version to go with. MariaDB is the bomb-diggity.

MySQL Engine

InnoDB not MyISAM. InnoDB may be surpassed by in-development engines like TokuDB. I ONLY use InnoDB, for everything.

Types of MySQL Servers to optimize

Seriously? Optimize EVERYTHING! The screenshots below are actual from one of my live servers. That server used to be 8GB RAM, but now as you may see in the screenshots, it is now only 2GB of RAM. I was able to save some serious $$$ by optimizing my server, without sacrificing speed… In fact I gained some speed in many instances.

I’ve used these optimization techniques on monster servers with 32GB of ram and many slaves, and also on a machine with 1GB of ram (running arch-linux).

Lire la suite…

Increase the phpMyAdmin Session Timeout

28/04/2016 Comments off

When phpMyAdmin is installed, the default session timeout value is too low for many users, making your phpMyAdmin session expire too soon. One could argue that a low session timeout value is a good idea from a security perspective. If you do not think this is an issue, here are a few simple steps that’ll let you change how long phpMyAdmin will keep your session(s) alive.

Open config.inc.php in the phpMyAdmin “root” directory. Look for a line that contains this: $cfg[‘LoginCookieValidity’]. Set the value to the desired number of seconds you want the session to stay alive (3600 = one hour, which is reasonable for most users). If you do not have that line in your config.inc.php file, add it like this:

$cfg[‘LoginCookieValidity’] = 3600;

Don’t forget to save the file, and then login again to phpMyAdmin. You may need to close the browser and re-open your phpMyAdmin URL.

This also assumes that the PHP session garbage collection is set-up accordingly. This can be done in a number of ways:

  • php.ini; add a line (or change an existing) that contains session.gc_maxlifetime = <seconds>
  • Apache configuration; add a line to the appropriate <Directory> block that says “php_admin_value session.gc_maxlifetime <seconds>”
  • config.inc.php (phpMyAdmin); after the previously edited line, add a line with “ini_set(‘session.gc_maxlifetime’, <seconds>);”

The <seconds> above is the same value that you set your variable to in config.inc.php at the beginning of this post, “3600” (sans quotes) in my case. (Some of these methods may or may not work on the server you’re using.)

This isn’t the only way to circumvent phpMyAdmin sessions expiring on you in the middle of that important work; you can, of course, configure phpMyAdmin to have appropriate access directly, thus allowing you to access your MySQL database(s) without entering a username and a password. You’ll find more information about this on the phpMyAdminwebsite.