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Articles taggués ‘reboot iptables’

Make the configuration of iptables persistent (Debian)

22/03/2017 Comments off

Objective

To make the configuration of iptables persistent on a Debian-based system

Background

The iptables and ip6tables commands can be used to instruct Linux to perform functions such as firewalling and network address translation, however the configuration that they create is non-persistent so is lost whenever the machine is rebooted. For most practical applications this is not the desired behaviour, so some means is needed to reinstate the configuration at boot time.

For security, the iptables configuration should be applied at an early stage of the bootstrap process: preferably before any network interfaces are brought up, and certainly before any network services are started or routing is enabled. If this is not done then there will be a window of vulnerability during which the machine is remotely accessible but not firewalled.

Scenario

Suppose you have a machine that you wish to protect using a firewall. You have written iptables and ip6tables rulesets, and wish to install them so that they will remain active if the machine is rebooted.

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How to run iptables automatically after reboot on Debian

22/03/2016 Comments off

reboot iptablesIf you have customized iptables rules, and would like to load the customized iptables rules persistently across reboots on Debian, you can leverage if-up.d scripts that are located in /etc/network/if-up.d. On Debian, any script that is marked as executable and placed in /etc/network/if-up.d gets executed when a network interface is brought up.

In order to run iptables automatically after reboot on Debian, do the following.

First, customize iptables as you wish, and then save the current iptables rule-set using iptables-save command.

$ sudo iptables-save > /etc/firewall.conf

The above command will dump the current iptables rule set into /etc/firewall.conf file which iptables-restore command can later use to restore the same rule set.

Now create the following if-up.d script called iptables that restores the saved iptables rule set.

$ sudo vi /etc/network/if-up.d/iptables
#!/bin/sh
iptables-restore < /etc/firewall.conf
$ sudo chmod  x /etc/network/if-up.d/iptables

Alternatively, you can add « iptables-restore < /etc/firewall.conf » command to /etc/rc.local, which gets executed at the end of system boot-up.

Source: Xmodulo