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Articles taggués ‘rsync’

Websync, web interface to manage your rsync tasks

15/01/2019 Comments off

Source: freedif.org

tasks_tabRsync is a great tool to replicate, sync some data on your computer. And I’m heavily relying on it to backup my server and to mirror some opensource projects and GNU/Linux Distributions.

But I’ve recently found a Web interface to manage all my rsync tasks called websync.

Websync is a web based rsync task manager where you can add, edit, clone, remove, scheduled,…. your rsync tasks while being able to have a remote host as source or destination of the task (With SSH RSA key too)

Under the free license MIT, Websync has been developped by Sander Struijk and is still actively being maintained, as you can see on github forum. But it is still an early project, so if you face any issue, make sure to report them on the issue tracker.

Interested to give it a shot, here is how to install Websync!

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Categories: Logiciel, Système Tags: , , ,

How to Backup Linux? 15 rsync Command Examples

14/01/2019 Comments off

Source: TheGeekStuff

rsync-commandrsync stands for Remote SYNC.

rsync is used to perform the backup operation in UNIX / Linux.

rsync utility is used to synchronize the files and directories from one location to another in an effective way. Backup location could be on local server or on remote server.

Important features of rsync

  • Speed: First time, rsync replicates the whole content between the source and destination directories. Next time, rsync transfers only the changed blocks or bytes to the destination location, which makes the transfer really fast.
  • Security: rsync allows encryption of data using ssh protocol during transfer.
  • Less Bandwidth: rsync uses compression and decompression of data block by block at the sending and receiving end respectively. So the bandwidth used by rsync will be always less compared to other file transfer protocols.
  • Privileges: No special privileges are required to install and execute rsync

Syntax

$ rsync options source destination

Source and destination could be either local or remote. In case of remote, specify the login name, remote server name and location.
Lire la suite…

Categories: Système Tags: , , , ,

Rsync (Remote Sync): 10 Practical Examples of Rsync Command in Linux

12/01/2019 Comments off

Source: tecmint.com (Tarunika Shrivastava)

Rsync (Remote Sync) is a most commonly used command for copying and synchronizing files and directories remotely as well as locally in Linux/Unix systems. With the help of rsync command you can copy and synchronize your data remotely and locally across directories, across disks and networks, perform data backups and mirroring between two Linux machines.

This article explains 10 basic and advanced usage of the rsync command to transfer your files remotely and locally in Linux based machines. You don’t need to be root user to run rsync command.

Some advantages and features of Rsync command
  1. It efficiently copies and sync files to or from a remote system.
  2. Supports copying links, devices, owners, groups and permissions.
  3. It’s faster than scp (Secure Copy) because rsync uses remote-update protocol which allows to transfer just the differences between two sets of files. First time, it copies the whole content of a file or a directory from source to destination but from next time, it copies only the changed blocks and bytes to the destination.
  4. Rsync consumes less bandwidth as it uses compression and decompression method while sending and receiving data both ends.
Basic syntax of rsync command
# rsync options source destination

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Categories: Système Tags: , ,

Ignore existing files or update only newer files with rsync

08/12/2018 Comments off

Rsync is a useful command line utility for synchronising files and directories across two different file systems. I recently needed to use rsync to only copy over files that did not already exist at the other end, so this post documents how to do this.

Copying from local to remote

Note that all the examples shown in the post are for copying files from the local computer to a remote server/computer.

Default behavior

The following command will recursively copy all files from the local filesystem from /var/www to the remote system at 10.1.1.1. Note the following:

  1. Any files that do not exist on the remote system are copied over
  2. Any that have been updated will be copied over, although note that rsync is extremely efficient in that only the changed parts of files are copied and if the file is exactly the same if it is not copied over at all
  3. Any that have been deleted on the local system are deleted on the remote
rsync -raz --progress /var/www 10.1.1.1:/var

Ignore existing files

Use the –ignore-existing flag to prevent files from being copied over that already exist on the remote server. By adding this, we eliminate behaviors 2 and 3 in the list above and all that is done is this:

  1. Any files that do not exist on the remote system are copied over
--ignore-existing -raz --progress /var/www 10.1.1.1:/var 

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Categories: Système Tags:

Using Rsync and SSH

17/10/2018 Comments off

Source: troy.jdmz.net

Keys, Validating, and Automation

This document covers using cron, ssh, and rsync to backup files over a local network or the Internet. Part of my goal is to ensure no user intervention is required when the computer is restarted (for passwords, keys, or key managers).
I like to backup some logging, mail, and configuration information sometimes on hosts across the network and Internet, and here is a way I have found to do it. You’ll need these packages installed:
  • rsync
  • openssh
  • cron (or vixie-cron)

Please note these instructions may be specific to Red Hat Linux versions 7.3, 9, and Fedora Core 3, but I hope they won’t be too hard to adapt to almost any *NIX type OS. The man pages for ‘ssh’ and ‘rsync’ should be helpful to you if you need to change some things (use the « man ssh » and « man rsync » commands). Lire la suite…

Categories: Système Tags: , , ,