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Articles taggués ‘scripting’

Configuring Log Rotation of Apache2 and Other Logs

18/11/2018 Aucun commentaire

source: lifeonubuntu.com

I went to check out my apache2 logs

ls /var/log/apache2/

and I noticed that they were being automatically rotated (access.log, access.log.1, etc.) and compressed with gzip (access.log.2.gz, etc.). This seems to be the default Ubuntu configuration. I wanted to make find out more, and I found this helpful article about Ubuntu logs, including Apache2 Log info and some basic log rotation info.

After reading through the info, I decided that I wanted to make a few changes. The log rotation happens via the brilliantly named logrotate command. It turns out that logrotate settings kept in 2 places. Lire la suite…

Cron Job Tutorial: Crontab Scheduling Syntax and Script Example

23/10/2018 Comments off

source: Devshed

Crontabs is very useful when doing website maintenance. You can use this feature for the following purposes:

  1. Deleting all files in a certain folder at regular intervals. If you accept user-uploaded files, then eventually it will clog your web hosting server. If you do not regularly delete these files, they will consume a lot of disk space and can slow down your website.
  2. Deleting files of a specific type at regular intervals. You can also choose to delete files of a specific type, instead of deleting all of the files in the folder. If you have PHP, HTML and MP3 files together inside the folder, you can delete only the MP3 files.
  3. Regularly backing up your MySQL database. This is one of the most important webmaster tasks. By using crontabs or the cron job feature, you can create a PHP script that will back up a selected MySQL database, and have it execute automatically executed at a specific, regular interval (e.g monthly, yearly, etc).

This tutorial will focus on creating a cron PHP script application, then configuring your cron hosting feature to execute these scripts automatically. Lire la suite…

Categories: Système Tags: , , ,

Howto: Geolocation for Fail2ban

12/10/2018 Comments off

source: fail2ban.org

 

Using geolocation to locate your attackers.

I use fail2ban on my servers to protect them from would-be attackers, if you don’t your either insanely nieve to the fact that somebody wants in your system, or your just wanting to see if you can get hacked. Most of the attackers I would assume are just after another « bot » in their « net », or maybe a place to host files.

Durzo hosts a script that allows you to log the attacks on you into a mysql database with geocoding, I thought this would be cool to use as I could see from where I was being attacked. I then got this working and another script to display the table in a web page so I could view the data easily.

I then found some scripts from Google to pull data from MySQL in a geolocation table and generate an XML file used to import into Google Maps. With some tweaking and customizing, I now have a map with the geolocation data as markers on the map. Not all the markers are right on a building, but they are close enough for me to see the areas from which attacks are coming.

Now on to the good stuff… Lire la suite…

Diff à distance

10/10/2018 Comments off

I just had a problem to solve: Compare two server config files on two servers to make sure they’re the same. Rather than using scp to copy the file from one machine to another, I used ssh’s ability to run commands remotely to get the contents of the file and piped it into diff. Here’s an example:

ssh user@server1 'cat /path/to/config/file.conf' | diff /path/to/other/config/file.conf -

I’ll leave it as an exercise for the user to write a shell script that will do this automatically, though it should be fairly easy to do.

Source: movetoiceland.com

Categories: Système Tags: , , ,

How to list the crontabs for all users?

02/10/2018 Comments off

I ended up writing a script (I’m trying to teach myself the finer points of bash scripting, so that’s why you don’t see something like Perl here). It’s not exactly a simple affair, but it does most of what I need. It uses Kyle’s suggestion for looking up individual users’ crontabs, but also deals with /etc/crontab(including the scripts launched by run-parts in /etc/cron.hourly/etc/cron.daily, etc.) and the jobs in the /etc/cron.d directory.source: How do I list all cron jobs for all users?

I ended up writing a script (I’m trying to teach myself the finer points of bash scripting, so that’s why you don’t see something like Perl here). It’s not exactly a simple affair, but it does most of what I need. It uses Kyle’s suggestion for looking up individual users’ crontabs, but also deals with /etc/crontab(including the scripts launched by run-parts in /etc/cron.hourly/etc/cron.daily, etc.) and the jobs in the /etc/cron.d directory.

It takes all of those and merges them into a display something like the following:

#!/bin/bash
# System-wide crontab file and cron job directory. Change these for your system.
 CRONTAB='/etc/crontab'
 CRONDIR='/etc/cron.d'
# Single tab character. Annoyingly necessary.
 tab=$(echo -en "\t")
# Given a stream of crontab lines, exclude non-cron job lines, replace
 # whitespace characters with a single space, and remove any spaces from the
 # beginning of each line.
 function clean_cron_lines() {
 while read line ; do
 echo "${line}" |
 egrep --invert-match '^($|\s*#|\s*[[:alnum:]_]+=)' |
 sed --regexp-extended "s/\s+/ /g" |
 sed --regexp-extended "s/^ //"
 done;
 }
# Given a stream of cleaned crontab lines, echo any that don't include the
 # run-parts command, and for those that do, show each job file in the run-parts
 # directory as if it were scheduled explicitly.
 function lookup_run_parts() {
 while read line ; do
 match=$(echo "${line}" | egrep -o 'run-parts (-{1,2}\S+ )*\S+')
if [[ -z "${match}" ]] ; then
 echo "${line}"
 else
 cron_fields=$(echo "${line}" | cut -f1-6 -d' ')
 cron_job_dir=$(echo "${match}" | awk '{print $NF}')
if [[ -d "${cron_job_dir}" ]] ; then
 for cron_job_file in "${cron_job_dir}"/* ; do # */
 [[ -f "${cron_job_file}" ]] && echo "${cron_fields} ${cron_job_file}"
 done
 fi
 fi
 done;
 }
# Temporary file for crontab lines.
 temp=$(mktemp) || exit 1
# Add all of the jobs from the system-wide crontab file.
 cat "${CRONTAB}" | clean_cron_lines | lookup_run_parts >"${temp}"
# Add all of the jobs from the system-wide cron directory.
 cat "${CRONDIR}"/* | clean_cron_lines >>"${temp}" # */
# Add each user's crontab (if it exists). Insert the user's name between the
 # five time fields and the command.
 while read user ; do
 crontab -l -u "${user}" 2>/dev/null |
 clean_cron_lines |
 sed --regexp-extended "s/^((\S+ +){5})(.+)$/\1${user} \3/" >>"${temp}"
done <
# Output the collected crontab lines. Replace the single spaces between the
 # fields with tab characters, sort the lines by hour and minute, insert the
 # header line, and format the results as a table.
 cat "${temp}" |
 sed --regexp-extended "s/^(\S+) +(\S+) +(\S+) +(\S+) +(\S+) +(\S+) +(.*)$/\1\t\2\t\3\t\4\t\5\t\6\t\7/" |
 sort --numeric-sort --field-separator="${tab}" --key=2,1 |
 sed "1i\mi\th\td\tm\tw\tuser\tcommand" |
 column -s"${tab}" -t
rm --force "${temp}"

source: How do I list all cron jobs for all users?