Remove a Person From a Photo With Photoshop CS5’s Content Aware Feature

19/11/2018 Categories: Logiciel Tags: Aucun commentaire

Source: tutsplus.com

Final Product What You’ll Be Creating

With the launch of the new Adobe Suite of programs comes the long awaited Adobe Photoshop CS5. Packed with new features to speed up your workflow it truly is the most advanced edition of Photoshop to date. One of the new features we will be looking at today is called Content Aware. This feature allows you to quickly fill in a selection with surrounding content making it look like a part of the original image. In this case we will choose to remove a person from a photo, this can be done in less than five minutes. With the additional image enhancements this tutorial will take you less than 10 minutes to complete.

 


Original Image

Before we begin, download the image that we will be working with. As you can see, there are two individuals in this photo. In today’s tutorial, we will use Photoshop CS5′s Content Aware Feature to remove the man on the left.


Step 1

Using the content aware tool on different images produces different results. An image with a gradient background such as the sky in this image is quite tricky to work with. Open beach.jpg in Photoshop.


Step 2

We are extracting the person on the left from this photo. Using the Pen Tool, (P) Begin by making a path around the subject. The nice thing about using content aware is that you do not have to be exact when making a selection. In fact, do your best not to cut too close to the subject.

Notice in the image below how far I am drawing the path from the subject. Try to keep this distance all the way around. If you go too close, Content Aware will take pixels from the subject. If you cut too far it will take pixels from the woman on the right.


Step 3

Once you complete the path around the subject, turn it into a selection. This can be done by right clicking on the path and selecting Make Selection.

A dialog box will pop-up, make sure the feathering is set to 0px. Leave all other options as they are. Click OK.


Step 4

Now we have an active selection around our subject. In this step we will make the subject disappear from the image using Content Aware Fill. To do this, go to Edit > Fill.

A dialog box will pop-up, make sure the Content Aware option is selected. Blending mode is set to normal and the opacity is at 100%. Hit OK.

You can cancel the selection at any time by making another selection or just clicking anywhere else on the page with any selection tool.


Step 5

In this step we will remove some of the other artifacts in the image using the same process. The content aware tool did miss a spot where the subject’s foot originally was. To do this, draw a rectangle around the area using the rectangle selection tool. And use the content aware fill as we have done in the previous steps.

Now let’s remove the people towards the right of the image. Create a rectangle selection around them and use the steps we just demonstrated to remove them.


Step 6 (Optional)

Using the Crop Tool (C) lets crop the image so that the focus is drawn to the woman jumping. To do this, just crop out an area of the image that you would like to keep. Beware of the shadow that is left behind from the person that we have removed. You can use the Content Aware feature to remove this shadow but I have decided to crop it out altogether.

Click the checkmark at the top to keep this area. Photoshop will discard the content that is outside of your crop area.


Step 7 (Optional)

In this step we will enhance the photo by giving it a more vibrant look. The colors currently appear somewhat dull. There are many ways to accomplish this but we will use Color Curves. To do this, go to Image > Adjustments > Curves, (Cmd + M). A dialog box will pop-up and we will select each of the channels, R, G, B and work on them separately. Select the Red channel from the dropdown menu.

We are going to make two points on the graph. One in the bottom of the top right square, and one in the top of the bottom left square.

Once you have made these points, make sure you enter the values for each. For the top right point the Output value is 199, and the input value is 185. For the bottom point the values are 56 and 68, respectively. You can play around with these setting and adjust them to whatever you feel is appropriate. Repeat this for each of the colors, Green and Blue.


Final Image

Your image should now look something like the one seen below. As you can see, we have removed the man on her left with very little effort using Photoshop CS5′s new Content Aware Feature.

Categories: Logiciel Tags:

Configurer une Freebox pour autoriser une connexion VPN à un routeur DD-WRT

19/11/2018 Categories: Réseau, Système Tags: , Aucun commentaire

Source: Autour de… Sam

Autour de… Sam
freebox-revolutionLa question revient assez souvent pour se connecter à distance chez soi au travers un VPN quand on dispose d’un routeur sous DD-Wrt derrière une box ADSL.
Dans le cas que vais expliquer ci-dessous, je prendrai le cas d’une Freebox V4 et d’une Freebox V6.

Il faut tout d’abord savoir que DD-Wrt embarque un très bon parefeu et que nos box ADSL françaises sont aussi équipées d’un parefeu quand elles sont en mode routeur et non pas en mode passerelle (gateway ou bridge). Lire la suite…

Categories: Réseau, Système Tags: ,

Trucs et astuces d’utilisation de SSH

Source: Lone Wolf $cripts

SSH est l’acronyme de Secure SHell. Il s’agit historiquement du remplaçant de Telnet. Telnet est l’outil utilisé pour dialoguer simplement avec un serveur. Sa force : il peut se connecter à n’importe quoi ou presque. Ainsi, un fou utilisant telnet peut envoyer des emails (protocole SMTP), lire des pages Web (protocole HTTP), remettre sa montre à l’heure (protocole NTP), etc… Son inconvénient majeur : toutes les informations circulent en clair sur le réseau, mots de passes compris. A une époque, telnet était utilisé pour ouvrir une session à distance sur un serveur… imaginez le cauchemard. SSH est un outil dédié à l’ouverture de sessions à distances via une connexion sécurisée. Pour faire simple, SSH est à telnet ce que HTTPS est à HTTP : une version chiffrée et sécurisée. Cet article présente certaines des subtilités de SSH. Lire la suite…

Configuring Log Rotation of Apache2 and Other Logs

source: lifeonubuntu.com

I went to check out my apache2 logs

ls /var/log/apache2/

and I noticed that they were being automatically rotated (access.log, access.log.1, etc.) and compressed with gzip (access.log.2.gz, etc.). This seems to be the default Ubuntu configuration. I wanted to make find out more, and I found this helpful article about Ubuntu logs, including Apache2 Log info and some basic log rotation info.

After reading through the info, I decided that I wanted to make a few changes. The log rotation happens via the brilliantly named logrotate command. It turns out that logrotate settings kept in 2 places. Lire la suite…

How to edit and understand /etc/fstab

17/11/2018 Categories: Système Tags: Aucun commentaire

Source: How to edit and understand /etc/fstab

There’s a file called /etc/fstab in your Linux system. Learn what its contents mean and how it’s used in conjunction with the mount command. When you learn to understand the fstab file, you’ll be able to edit its contents yourself, too.

In this tuXfile I assume you already know how to mount filesystems and partitions with the mount command. If you don’t, I suggest reading the Mounting tuXfile before reading this one.

Author: Nana Långstedt < nana.langstedt at gmail.com >
tuXfile created: 12 October 2003
Last updated: 5 September 2009

What is fstab and why it’s useful

fstab is a configuration file that contains information of all the partitions and storage devices in your computer. The file is located under /etc, so the full path to this file is /etc/fstab.

/etc/fstab contains information of where your partitions and storage devices should be mounted and how. If you can’t access your Windows partition from Linux, aren’t able to mount your CD or write to your floppy as a normal user, or have problems with your CD-RW, you probably have a misconfigured /etc/fstab file. So, you can usually fix your mounting problems by editing yourfstab file.

/etc/fstab is just a plain text file, so you can open and edit it with any text editor you’re familiar with. However, note that you must have the root privileges before editing fstab. So, in order to edit the file, you must either log in as root or use the su command to become root.

Overview of the file

Of course everybody has a bit different /etc/fstab file because the partitions, devices and their properties are different on different systems. But the basic structure of fstab is always the same. Here’s an example of the contents of /etc/fstab:

/dev/hda2 / ext2 defaults 1 1
/dev/hdb1 /home ext2 defaults 1 2
/dev/cdrom /media/cdrom auto ro,noauto,user,exec 0 0
/dev/fd0 /media/floppy auto rw,noauto,user,sync 0 0
proc /proc proc defaults 0 0
/dev/hda1 swap swap pri=42 0 0

What does all this gibberish mean? As you see, every line (or row) contains the information of one device or partition. The first column contains the device name, the second one its mount point, third its filesystem type, fourth the mount options, fifth (a number) dump options, and sixth (another number) filesystem check options. Let’s take a closer look at this stuff.

1st and 2nd columns: Device and default mount point

The first and second columns should be pretty straightforward. They tell the mount command exactly the same things that you tell mount when you mount stuff manually: what is the device or partition, and what is the mount point. The mount point specified for a device in /etc/fstab is its default mount point. That is the directory where the device will be mounted if you don’t specify any other mount point when mounting the device.

Like you already learned from the Mounting tuXfile, most Linux distros create special directories for mount points. Most distros create them under /mnt, but some (at least SuSE) under /media. As you probably noticed when looking at the example fstab, I use SuSE’s mount points as an example.

What does all this mean? If I type the following command:

$ mount /dev/fd0… my floppy will be mounted in /media/floppy, because that’s the default mount point specified in /etc/fstab. If there is no entry for /dev/fd0 in my fstab when I issue the command above,mount gets very confused because it doesn’t know where to mount the floppy.

You can freely change the default mount points listed in /etc/fstab if you’re not satisfied with the defaults your distro has given you. Just make sure the mount point is a directory that already exists on your system. If it doesn’t, simply create it.

Some partitions and devices are also automatically mounted when your Linux system boots up. For example, have a look at the example fstab above. There are lines that look like this:

/dev/hda2 / ext2 defaults 1 1
/dev/hdb1 /home ext2 defaults 1 2

As you’ve learned, these lines mean that /dev/hda2 will be mounted to / and /dev/hdb1 to /home. This is done automatically when your Linux system boots up… if it wouldn’t, you’d have a hard time using your cool Linux system because all the programs you use are in / and you wouldn’t be able to run them if / wasn’t mounted! But how does the system know where you want to mount/dev/hda2 and /dev/hdb1? By looking at the /etc/fstab file of course.

Lire la suite…

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