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SIP Server IPTABLES Sample firewall Rules !

08/04/2020 Aucun commentaire

SIP Server protection

IPtables rules

iptables -I INPUT -p udp -m udp –dport 5060 -m string –string "REGISTER sip:" –algo bm -m recent –set –name VOIP –rsource
iptables -I INPUT -p udp -m udp –dport 5060 -m string –string "REGISTER sip:" –algo bm -m recent –update –seconds 60 –hitcount 12 –rttl –name VOIP –rsource -j DROP
iptables -I INPUT -p udp -m udp –dport 5060 -m string –string "INVITE sip:" –algo bm -m recent –set –name VOIPINV –rsource
iptables -I INPUT -p udp -m udp –dport 5060 -m string –string "INVITE sip:" –algo bm -m recent –update –seconds 60 –hitcount 12 –rttl –name VOIPINV –rsource -j DROP
iptables -I INPUT -p udp -m hashlimit –hashlimit 6/sec –hashlimit-mode srcip,dstport –hashlimit-name tunnel_limit -m udp –dport 5060 -j ACCEPT
iptables -I INPUT -p udp -m udp –dport 5060 -j DROP

# RTP – the media stream
# (related to the port range in /etc/asterisk/rtp.conf)
iptables -A INPUT -p udp -m udp –dport 10000:20000 -j ACCEPT

# MGCP – if you use media gateway control protocol in your configuration
iptables -A INPUT -p udp -m udp –dport 2727 -j ACCEPT

Sample script

#!/bin/bash
EXIF="eth0"
# Clear any existing firewall stuff before we start
/sbin/iptables –flush
# As the default policies, drop all incoming traffic but allow all
# outgoing traffic. This will allow us to make outgoing connections
# from any port, but will only allow incoming connections on the ports
# specified below.
# Allow connections from my machines
/sbin/iptables -A INPUT -p tcp -i $EXIF -m state –state NEW -s 109.161.251.214 -j ACCEPT
/sbin/iptables –policy INPUT DROP
/sbin/iptables –policy OUTPUT ACCEPT
# Allow all incoming traffic if it is coming from the local loopback device
/sbin/iptables -A INPUT -i lo -j ACCEPT
# Accept all incoming traffic associated with an established connection, or a "related" connection
/sbin/iptables -A INPUT -i $EXIF -m state –state ESTABLISHED,RELATED -j ACCEPT
# Check new packets are SYN packets for syn-flood protection
/sbin/iptables -A INPUT -p tcp ! –syn -m state –state NEW -j DROP
# Drop fragmented packets
/sbin/iptables -A INPUT -f -j DROP
# Drop malformed XMAS packets
/sbin/iptables -A INPUT -p tcp –tcp-flags ALL ALL -j DROP
# Drop null packets
/sbin/iptables -A INPUT -p tcp –tcp-flags ALL NONE -j DROP
# Allow connections to port (4501) – ssh. You can add other ports you need in here
/sbin/iptables -A INPUT -p tcp -i $EXIF –dport 4501 -m state –state NEW -j ACCEPT
# Allow connections to port (4500) – Webmin . You can add other ports you need in here
/sbin/iptables -A INPUT -p tcp -i $EXIF –dport 4500 -m state –state NEW -j ACCEPT
# Allow connections to port (80&443) – www. You can add other ports you need in here
/sbin/iptables -A INPUT -p tcp -i $EXIF –dport 80 -m state –state NEW -j ACCEPT
/sbin/iptables -A INPUT -p tcp -i $EXIF –dport 443 -m state –state NEW -j ACCEPT
# Allow connections from my machines
/sbin/iptables -A INPUT -p tcp -i $EXIF -m state –state NEW -s 80.241.212.93 -j ACCEPT
# Allow SIP connections
/sbin/iptables -A INPUT -p udp -i $EXIF –dport 5060 -m udp -j ACCEPT
/sbin/iptables -A INPUT -p tcp -i $EXIF –dport 5060 -m tcp -j ACCEPT
/sbin/iptables -A INPUT -p udp -i $EXIF –dport 10000:20000 -m udp -j ACCEPT
# Allow icmp input so that people can ping us
/sbin/iptables -A INPUT -p icmp –icmp-type 8 -m state –state NEW -j ACCEPT
# Log then drop any packets that are not allowed. You will probably want to turn off the logging
#/sbin/iptables -A INPUT -j LOG
/sbin/iptables -A INPUT -j REJECT

Source: Ahmad Sabry ElGendi

http://sysadminman.net/blog/2008/iptables-for-asterisk-49

http://www.voip-info.org/wiki/view/Asterisk+firewall+rules

Categories: Réseau, Sécurité Tags: ,

13 Apache Web Server Security and Hardening Tips

07/04/2020 Aucun commentaire

Apache-Security-Tips1We all are very familiar with Apache web server, it is a very popular web server to host your web files or your website on the web. Here are some links which can help you to configure Apache web server on your Linux box.

Here in this tutorial, I’ll cover some main tips to secure your web server. Before you apply these changes in your web server, you should have some basics of the Apache server.

  • Document root Directory: /var/www/html or /var/www
  • Main Configuration file: /etc/httpd/conf/httpd.conf (RHEL/CentOS/Fedora) and /etc/apache/apache2.conf(Debian/Ubuntu).
  • Default HTTP Port: 80 TCP
  • Default HTTPS Port: 443 TCP
  • Test your Configuration file settings and syntax: httpd -t
  • Access Log files of Web Server: /var/log/httpd/access_log
  • Error Log files of Web Server: /var/log/httpd/error_log

1. How to hide Apache Version and OS Identity from Errors

When you install Apache with source or any other package installers like yum, it displays the version of your Apache web server installed on your server with the Operating system name of your server in Errors. It also shows the information about Apache modules installed in your server.

Show-Apache-Version

Show-Apache-Version

In above picture, you can see that Apache is showing its version with the OS installed in your server. This can be a major security threat to your web server as well as your Linux box too. To prevent Apache to not to display these information to the world, we need to make some changes in Apache main configuration file.

Open configuration file with vim editor and search for “ServerSignature“, its by default On. We need to Off these server signature and the second line “ServerTokens Prod” tells Apache to return only Apache as product in the server response header on the every page request, It suppress the OS, major and minor version info.

# vim /etc/httpd/conf/httpd.conf (RHEL/CentOS/Fedora)
# vim /etc/apache/apache2.conf (Debian/Ubuntu)
ServerSignature Off
ServerTokens Prod
# service httpd restart (RHEL/CentOS/Fedora)
# service apache2 restart (Debian/Ubuntu)
 

Hide-Apache-Version

2. Disable Directory Listing

By default Apache list all the content of Document root directory in the absence of index file. Please see the image below.

Apache-Directory-Listing

Apache-Directory-Listing

We can turn off directory listing by using Options directive in configuration file for a specific directory. For that we need to make an entry in httpd.conf or apache2.conf file.
<Directory /var/www/html>
    Options -Indexes
</Directory>
Hide-Apache-Directory-Listing

Hide-Apache-Directory-Listing

Lire la suite…

Categories: Logiciel, Sécurité Tags: , ,

How to turn off server signature on Apache2 web server

07/04/2020 Aucun commentaire

Question: Whenever Apache2 web server returns error pages (e.g., 404 not found, 403 access forbidden pages), it shows web server signature (e.g., Apache version number and operating system info) at the bottom of the pages. Also, when Apache2 web server serves any PHP pages, it reveals PHP version info. How can I turn off these web server signatures in Apache2 web server?

Revealing web server signature with server/PHP version info can be a security risk as you are essentially telling attackers known vulnerabilities of your system. Thus it is recommended you disable all web server signatures as part of server hardening process.

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Disable Apache Web Server Signature

Disabling Apache web server signature can be achieved by editing Apache config file.

On Debian, Ubuntu or Linux Mint:

$ sudo vi /etc/apache2/apache2.conf

On CentOS, Fedora, RHEL or Arch Linux:

$ sudo vi /etc/httpd/conf/httpd.conf

Add the following two lines at the end of Apache config file.

ServerSignature Off
ServerTokens Prod

Then restart web server to activate the change:

$ sudo service apache2 restart (Debian, Ubuntu or Linux Mint)
$ sudo service httpd restart (CentOS/RHEL 6)
$ sudo systemctl restart httpd.service (Fedora, CentOS/RHEL 7, Arch Linux)

The first line ‘ServerSignature Off‘ makes Apache2 web server hide Apache version info on any error pages.

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However, without the second line ‘ServerTokens Prod‘, Apache server will still include a detailed server token in HTTP response headers, which reveals Apache version number.

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What the second line ‘ServerTokens Prod‘ does is to suppress a server token in HTTP response headers to a bare minimal.

So with both lines in place, Apache will not reveal Apache version info in either web pages or HTTP response headers.

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Hide PHP Version

Another potential security threat is PHP version info leak in HTTP response headers. By default, Apache web server includes PHP version info via « X-Powered-By » field in HTTP response headers. If you want to hide PHP version in HTTP headers, open php.ini file with a text editor, look for « expose_php = On », and change it to « expose_php = Off ».

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On Debian, Ubuntu, or Linux Mint:

$ sudo vi /etc/php5/apache2/php.ini

On CentOS, Fedora, RHEL or Arch Linux:

$ sudo vi /etc/php.ini

expose_php = Off

Finally, restart Apache2 web server to reload updated PHP config file.

Now you will no longer see « X-Powered-By » field in HTTP response headers.

Source: Xmodulo

Categories: Logiciel, Sécurité Tags: , ,

How to enable SSL for MySQL server and client with ssh

06/04/2020 Aucun commentaire

MySQL secure SSH

When users want to have a secure connection to their MySQL server, they often rely on VPN or SSH tunnels. Yet another option for securing MySQL connections is to enable SSL wrapper on an MySQL server. Each of these approaches has its own pros and cons. For example, in highly dynamic environments where a lot of short-lived MySQL connections occur, VPN or SSH tunnels may be a better choice than SSL as the latter involves expensive per-connection SSL handshake computation. On the other hand, for those applications with relatively few long-running MySQL connections, SSL based encryption can be reasonable. Since MySQL server already comes with built-in SSL support, you do not need to implement a separate security layer like VPN or SSH tunnel, which has their own maintenance overhead.

The implementation of SSL in an MySQL server encrypts all data going back and forth between a server and a client, thereby preventing potential eavesdropping or data sniffing in wide area networks or within data centers. In addition, SSL also provides identify verification by means of SSL certificates, which can protect users against possible phishing attacks.

In this article, we will show you how to enable SSL on MySQL server. Note that the same procedure is also applicable to MariaDB server.

Creating Server SSL Certificate and Private Key

We have to create an SSL certificate and private key for an MySQL server, which will be used when connecting to the server over SSL.

First, create a temporary working directory where we will keep the key and certificate files.

$ sudo mkdir ~/cert
$ cd ~/cert

Make sure that OpenSSL is installed on your system where an MySQL server is running. Normally all Linux distributions have OpenSSL installed by default. To check if OpenSSL is installed, use the following command.

$ openssl version
OpenSSL 1.0.1f 6 Jan 2014

Now go ahead and create the CA private key and certificate. The following commands will create ca-key.pem and ca-cert.pem.

$ openssl genrsa 2048 > ca-key.pem
$ openssl req -sha1 -new -x509 -nodes -days 3650 -key ca-key.pem > ca-cert.pem

The second command will ask you several questions. It does not matter what you put in these field. Just fill out those fields.

The next step is to create a private key for the server.

$ openssl req -sha1 -newkey rsa:2048 -days 730 -nodes -keyout server-key.pem > server-req.pem

This command will ask several questions again, and you can put the same answers which you have provided in the previous step.

Next, export the server’s private key to RSA-type key with this command below.

$ openssl rsa -in server-key.pem -out server-key.pem

Finally, generate a server certificate using the CA certificate.

$ openssl x509 -sha1 -req -in server-req.pem -days 730 -CA ca-cert.pem -CAkey ca-key.pem -set_serial 01 > server-cert.pem

Lire la suite…

Neat tricks with iptables

02/04/2020 Aucun commentaire

tricks iptablesNeat tricks with iptables: The past few months have seen me digging deep into the world of TCP/IP and firewalls. It has been a fascinating journey into packet queueing and TCP headers, three-way handshakes and ICMP broadcasts.

The result of this research has been the ongoing creation of a firewall to protect my laptop against open networks, and my Internet server from port scanning and DoS attacks. I’m pretty certain I haven’t even scratched the surface yet, but I have found some settings to protect against the most common attacks. Below I’ll summarize the major pieces of my new firewall, and the logic behind it.

Address spoofing: win with iptables

The easiest way to fool a server is to construct a packet that whose source address is faked, or spoofed. This is surprisingly easy to do. To craft packets, I use a very powerful network analysis tool called Scapy. Scapy will allow you to create packets on the fly, transmit them, and scan your network for any response.

For example, let’s say I’m on my local network (which I am right now, as I write this), connected via wireless as192.168.15.113. I’m going to interact with the router, which is at 192.168.15.1. For the purposes of analysis, I’ve also setup a virtual machine running on 192.168.15.114, so I can see what happens when I spoof the packet.

So, let’s say I spoof an ICMP echo-request packet, sent to .1 (router) from .113 (me) but spoofed as if it had come from .114 (virtual machine). In Scapy this is quite easy to do. I run two scapy session in two terminal windows. In the first I type:

>>> send(IP(src="192.168.15.114", dst="192.168.15.1")/ICMP())
.
Sent 1 packets.

Although my machine is at .113, I’m telling scapy to set the source address for the ICMP echo-request packet to.114, which is the host I want to attack. I’m sending this “ping” to the router, which should now send its response back to .114 instead of me.

In my other terminal window, I run scapy again, this time in promiscuous mode as a packet sniffer. Promiscuous mode means that it will capture all packets seen on the network, not just those destined for my own machine. Here’s what I see:

>>> sniff(filter="icmp")
^C
>>> _.show()
0000 Ether / IP / ICMP 192.168.15.114 > 192.168.15.1 echo-request 0
0001 Ether / IP / ICMP 192.168.15.1 > 192.168.15.114 echo-reply 0

I ran the sniffer, then did the ping, then stopped the sniffer by pressing Control-C. I can see that two ICMP packets were seen during the sniff. By showing the contents of these packets, I can see both the packet that I transmitted, and the response – which came back to .114!

That’s a spoof. How can it be used to attack someone? Read on in the next section, since what we just did forms the basis for a smurf attack.

Some packet spoofs, however, are more obvious. For example, a packet coming from the Internet bound for a private IP address or certain broadcast addresses, such as address beginning with 192.168 or 224. These are never valid, so it’s a good idea to drop such packets immediately upon receipt. Here are the iptables rules to do this:

# Reject packets from RFC1918 class networks (i.e., spoofed)
iptables -A INPUT -s 10.0.0.0/8     -j DROP
iptables -A INPUT -s 169.254.0.0/16 -j DROP
iptables -A INPUT -s 172.16.0.0/12  -j DROP
iptables -A INPUT -s 127.0.0.0/8    -j DROP

iptables -A INPUT -s 224.0.0.0/4      -j DROP
iptables -A INPUT -d 224.0.0.0/4      -j DROP
iptables -A INPUT -s 240.0.0.0/5      -j DROP
iptables -A INPUT -d 240.0.0.0/5      -j DROP
iptables -A INPUT -s 0.0.0.0/8        -j DROP
iptables -A INPUT -d 0.0.0.0/8        -j DROP
iptables -A INPUT -d 239.255.255.0/24 -j DROP
iptables -A INPUT -d 255.255.255.255  -j DROP

Here’s the same thing, now for ipfw users:

# Verify the reverse path to help avoid spoofed packets.  This means any
# packet coming from a particular interface must have an address matching the
# netmask for that interface.
ipfw add 100 deny all from any to any not verrevpath in

# Deny all inbound traffic from RFC1918 address spaces (spoof!)
ipfw add 110 deny all from 192.168.0.0/16 to any in
ipfw add 120 deny all from 172.16.0.0/12 to any in
ipfw add 130 deny all from 10.0.0.0/8 to any in
ipfw add 140 deny all from 127.0.0.0/8 to any in

ipfw add 150 deny all from 224.0.0.0/4 to any in
ipfw add 160 deny all from any to 224.0.0.0/4 in
ipfw add 170 deny all from 240.0.0.0/5 to any in
ipfw add 180 deny all from any to 240.0.0.0/5 in
ipfw add 190 deny all from 0.0.0.0/8 to any in
ipfw add 200 deny all from any to 0.0.0.0/8 in
ipfw add 210 deny all from any to 239.255.255.0/24 in
ipfw add 220 deny all from any to 255.255.255.255 in

Lire la suite…

Categories: Réseau, Sécurité Tags: ,