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Configurer IPTables pour Netfilter sous Debian Squeeze

15/11/2022 Aucun commentaire

Qu’est-ce que c’est?

IPTables regroupe les lignes de commandes nécessaires à la gestion de Netfilter. Oui mais que fait Netfilter ? Pour les anglophones, vous aurez remarquer que dans Netfilter, il y a Net et il y a Filter donc à priori ça va parler d’Internet et de filtrage. Et qui dit filtrage, veut dire Firewall.

Voilà le mot est laché ! Le couple Netfilter/IPTables permet de faire du filtrage de port grâce à des règles de pare-feu. Il sera alors possible de bloquer certains paquets IP et de laisser passer ceux qui nous intéressent. Par exemple par le port 80 (le port pour http), le trafic Internet sera possible et votre navigateur préféré vous emmènera sur les autoroutes du savoir offert par Internet. Lire la suite…

System: fail2ban and iptables

31/10/2022 Comments off

source: http://www.the-art-of-web.com/system/fail2ban/

Around the beginning of 2005 we saw an increase in brute-force ssh attacks – people or robots trying different combinations of username and password to log into remote servers. A quick search on this topic returns many references to iptables and ipchains but noone really explained how they work.

Having just gone through this learning curve myself, and found a satisfactory solution in the fail2ban package, I’m going to try and explain how to achieve the simple goal of banning IP addresses that make repeated failed ssh login attempts.

If you want more technical information regarding firewalls and iptables in particular, see the References section at the bottom of this page. Lire la suite…

Rate-limit Incoming Port 22 Connections

23/10/2022 Comments off

Both netfilter and pf provides rate-limit option to perform simple throttling on incoming connections on port # 22.

Iptables Example

The following example will drop incoming connections which make more than 5 connection attempts upon port 22 within 60 seconds:

#!/bin/bash
inet_if=eth1
ssh_port=22
$IPT -I INPUT -p tcp --dport ${ssh_port} -i ${inet_if} -m state --state NEW -m recent  --set
$IPT -I INPUT -p tcp --dport ${ssh_port} -i ${inet_if} -m state --state NEW -m recent  --update --seconds 60 --hitcount 5 -j DROP

Call above script from your iptables scripts. Another config option:

$IPT -A INPUT  -i ${inet_if} -p tcp --dport ${ssh_port} -m state --state NEW -m limit --limit 3/min --limit-burst 3 -j ACCEPT
$IPT -A INPUT  -i ${inet_if} -p tcp --dport ${ssh_port} -m state --state ESTABLISHED -j ACCEPT
$IPT -A OUTPUT -o ${inet_if} -p tcp --sport ${ssh_port} -m state --state ESTABLISHED -j ACCEPT
# another one line example
# $IPT -A INPUT -i ${inet_if} -m state --state NEW,ESTABLISHED,RELATED -p tcp --dport 22 -m limit --limit 5/minute --limit-burst 5-j ACCEPT

See iptables man page for more details.

*BSD PF Example

The following will limits the maximum number of connections per source to 20 and rate limit the number of connections to 15 in a 5 second span. If anyone breaks our rules add them to our abusive_ips table and block them for making any further connections. Finally, flush keyword kills all states created by the matching rule which originate from the host which exceeds these limits.

sshd_server_ip="202.54.1.5"
table <abusive_ips> persist
block in quick from <abusive_ips>
pass in on $ext_if proto tcp to $sshd_server_ip port ssh flags S/SA keep state (max-src-conn 20, max-src-conn-rate 15/5, overload <abusive_ips> flush)

psad: Linux Detect And Block Port Scan Attacks In Real Time

20/09/2022 Comments off

Source: NixCraft

Q. How do I detect port scan attacks by analyzing Debian Linux firewall log files and block port scans in real time? How do I detect suspicious network traffic under Linux?

A. A port scanner (such as nmap) is a piece of software designed to search a network host for open ports. Cracker can use nmap to scan your network before starting attack. You can always see scan patterns by visiting /var/log/messages. But, I recommend the automated tool called psad – the port scan attack detector under Linux which is a collection of lightweight system daemons that run on Linux machines and analyze iptables log messages to detect port scans and other suspicious traffic.

psad makes use of Netfilter log messages to detect, alert, and (optionally) block port scans and other suspect traffic. For tcp scans psad analyzes tcp flags to determine the scan type (syn, fin, xmas, etc.) and corresponding command line options that could be supplied to nmap to generate such a scan. In addition, psad makes use of many tcp, udp, and icmp signatures contained within the Snort intrusion detection system.

Install psad under Debian / Ubuntu Linux

Type the following command to install psad, enter:
$ sudo apt-get update
$ sudo apt-get install psad

Lire la suite…

Nmap Reference Guide

13/09/2022 Comments off

NMAP: Host Discovery

nmap reference guideNMAP: One of the very first steps in any network reconnaissance mission is to reduce a (sometimes huge) set of IP ranges into a list of active or interesting hosts. Scanning every port of every single IP address is slow and usually unnecessary.

Of course what makes a host interesting depends greatly on the scan purposes. Network administrators may only be interested in hosts running a certain service, while security auditors may care about every single device with an IP address. An administrator may be comfortable using just an ICMP ping to locate hosts on his internal network, while an external penetration test may use a diverse set of dozens of probes in an attempt to evade firewall restrictions.

Because host discovery needs are so diverse, Nmap offers a wide variety of options for customizing the techniques used. Host discovery is sometimes called ping scan, but it goes well beyond the simple ICMP echo request packets associated with the ubiquitous ping tool. Users can skip the ping step entirely with a list scan (-sL) or by disabling ping (-Pn), or committed the network with arbitrary combinations of multi-port TCP SYN/ACK, UDP, SCTP INIT and ICMP probes.

The goal of these probes is to solicit responses which demonstrate that an IP address is actually active (is being used by a host or network device). On many networks, only a small percentage of IP addresses are active at any given time. This is particularly common with private address space such as 10.0.0.0/8. That network has 16 million IPs, but I have seen it used by companies with less than a thousand machines. Host discovery can find those machines in a sparsely allocated sea of IP addresses.

If no. host discovery options are given, Nmap sends an ICMP echo request, a TCP SYN packet to port 443, a TCP ACK packet to port 80, and an ICMP timestamp request. (For IPv6, the ICMP timestamp request is omitted because it is not part of ICMPv6.) These defaults are equivalent to the – PE - PS443 - PA80 - PP options. The exceptions to this are the ARP (for IPv4) and Neighbor Discovery (for IPv6) scans which are used for any targets on a local ethernet network.

For unprivileged Unix shell users, the default probes are a SYN packet to ports 80 and 443 using the connect system call. This host is often sufficient when local scanning discovery networks, but a more comprehensive set of discovery probes is recommended for security auditing. Lire la suite…

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