Archive

Articles taggués ‘linux’

How can I find out if a specific program is installed?

19/01/2021 Aucun commentaire

there’s always apt-cache policy <package-name> (no sudo needed).

Not installed:

olivier@neews:/$ apt-cache policy gnuift
 gnuift:
   Installed: (none)
   Candidate: 0.1.14-11
   Version table:
      0.1.14-11 0
         500 http://archive.ubuntu.com/ubuntu/ oneiric/universe amd64 Packages

Installed:

olivier@neews:/$ apt-cache policy firefox
 firefox:
   Installed: 8.0+build1-0ubuntu0.11.10.3
   Candidate: 8.0+build1-0ubuntu0.11.10.3
   Version table:
  *** 8.0+build1-0ubuntu0.11.10.3 0
         500 http://archive.ubuntu.com/ubuntu/ oneiric-updates/main amd64 Packages
         500 http://archive.ubuntu.com/ubuntu/ oneiric-security/main amd64 Packages
         100 /var/lib/dpkg/status
      7.0.1+build1+nobinonly-0ubuntu2 0
         500 http://archive.ubuntu.com/ubuntu/ oneiric/main amd64 Packages

Or dpkg: dpkg -l | grep -E '^ii' | grep <package name>. When it’s not installed it won’t show output. When it is, it’ll show something like:

olivier@neews:~$ dpkg -l | grep -E '^ii' | grep firefox
 ii  firefox                                                     8.0+build1-0ubuntu0.11.10.3                            Safe and easy web browser from Mozilla
 ii  firefox-branding                                            8.0+build1-0ubuntu0.11.10.3                            Safe and easy web browser from Mozilla - transitional package
 ii  firefox-globalmenu                                          8.0+build1-0ubuntu0.11.10.3                            Unity appmenu integration for Firefox
 ii  firefox-gnome-support                                       8.0+build1-0ubuntu0.11.10.3                            Safe and easy web browser from Mozilla - GNOME support
 ii  firefox-locale-en                                           8.0+build1-0ubuntu0.11.10.3                            English language pack for Firefox
It's obviously a fuzzier search but handy if you're not sure which package you're looking for.
 
 For manually installed things...
 
 A bit harder but if they're on the current path, you could just run them. That's a bit of mission so I'd rather just run:
 
 oli@bert:/$ which chromium-browser
 /usr/bin/chromium-browser

And:

oli@bert:/$ which gnuift
# returns nothing

Which is better?

That depends on the sanity of user. There’s nothing to stop somebody installing something called chromium-browser that isn’t Chromium. They could even package it up incorrectly and install that. Neither method can be 100% certain.

But assuming the owner is sane – packages should be good enough for most people.

Categories: Système Tags: , , ,

Do-It-Yourself Backup System Using Rsync

16/01/2021 Aucun commentaire

What is rsync?

rsync-terminalRsync is a program for synchronizing two directory trees across different file systems even if they are on different computers. It can run its host to host communications over ssh to keep things secure and to provide key based authentication. If a file is already present in the target and is the same as on the source the file will not be transmitted. If the file on the target is different than the one on the source then only the parts of it that are different are transferred. These features greatly increase the performance of rsync over a network.

What are hard links?

Hard links are similar to symlinks. They are normally created using the ln command but without the -s switch. A hard link is when two file entries point to the same inode and disk blocks. Unlike symlinks there isn’t a file and a pointer to the file but rather two links to the same file. If you delete either entry the other will remain and will still contain the data. Here is an example of both:

  ------------- Symbolic Link Demo -------
  % echo foo > x
  % ln -s x y
  % ls -li ?
  38062 -rw-r--r--  1 kmk users 4 Jul 25 14:28 x
  38066 lrwxrwxrwx  1 kmk users 1 Jul 25 14:28 y -> x
  -- As you can see, y is only a pointer to x.
  % grep . ?
  x:foo
  y:foo
  -- They contain the same data.
  % rm x
  % ls -li ?
  38066 lrwxrwxrwx  1 kmk users 1 Jul 25 14:28 y -> x
  % grep . ?
  grep: y: No such file or directory
  -- Now that x is gone y is simply broken.
  ------------ Hard Link Demo ------------
  % echo foo > x
  % ln x y
  % ls -li ?
  38062 -rw-r--r--  2 kmk users 4 Jul 25 14:28 x
  38062 -rw-r--r--  2 kmk users 4 Jul 25 14:28 y
  -- They are the same file occupying the same disk space.
  % grep . ?
  x:foo
  y:foo
  -- They contain the same data.
  % rm x
  % ls -li ?
  38062 -rw-r--r--  1 kmk users 4 Jul 25 14:28 y
  % grep . ?
  y:foo
  -- Now y is simply an ordinary file.
  ---------- Breaking a Hard Link ----------
  % echo foo > x
  % ln x y
  % ls -li ?
  38062 -rw-r--r--  2 kmk users 4 Jul 25 14:34 x
  38062 -rw-r--r--  2 kmk users 4 Jul 25 14:34 y
  % grep . ?
  x:foo
  y:foo
  % rm y ; echo bar > y
  % ls -li ?
  38062 -rw-r--r--  1 kmk users 4 Jul 25 14:34 x
  38066 -rw-r--r--  1 kmk users 4 Jul 25 14:34 y
  % grep . ?
  x:foo
  y:bar

Why backup with rsync instead of something else?

  • Disk based: Rsync is a disk based backup system. It doesn’t use tapes which are too slow to backup (and more importantly restore) modern systems with large hard drives. Also, disk based backup solutions are much cheaper than equivalently sized tape backup systems.
  • Fast: Rsync only backs up what has changed since the last backup. It NEVER has to repeat the full backup unlike most other systems that have monthly/weekly/daily differential configurations.
  • Less work for the backup client: Most of the work in rsync backups including the rotation process is done on the backup server which is usually dedicated to doing backups. This means that the client system being backed up is not hit with as much load as with some other backup programs. The load can also be tailored to your particular needs through several rsync options and backup system design decisions.
  • Fastest restores possible: If you just need to restore a single file or set of files it is as simple as a cp or scp command. Restoring an entire file system is just a reverse of the backup procedure. Restoring an entire system is a bit long but is less work than backup systems that require you to reinstall your OS first and about the same as other manual backup systems like dump or tar.
  • Only one restore needed: Even though each backup is an incremental they are all accessible as full backups. This means you only restore the backup you want instead of restoring a full and an incremental or a monthly followed by a weekly followed by a daily.
  • Cross Platform: Rsync can backup and recover anything that can run rsync. I have used it to backup Linux, Windows, DOS, OpenBSD, Solaris, and even ancient SunOS 4 systems. The only limitation is that the file system that the backups are stored on must support all of the file metadata that the file systems containing files to be backed up supports. In other words if you were to use a vfat file system for your backups you would not be able to preserve file ownership when backing up an ext3 file system. If this is a problem for you try looking into rdiff-backup.
  • Cheap: It doesn’t seem like it would be cheap to have enough disk space for 2 copies of everything and then some but it is. With tape drives you have to choose between a cheap drive with expensive tapes or an expensive drive with cheap tapes. In a hard drive based system you just buy cheap hard drives and use RAID to tie them together. My current backup server uses two 500GB IDE drives in a software RAID-0 configuration for a total of 1TB for about $100 which is about 1/6th what I paid for the DDS3 tape drive that I used to use and that doesn’t even include the tapes that cost about $10/12GB.
  • Internet: Since rsync can run over ssh and only transfers what has changed it is perfect for backing up things across the internet. This is perfect for backing up and updating a web site at a web hosting company or even a co-located server. Internet based backup systems are also becoming more and more popular. Rsync is the perfect tool to backup to such services over the internet.
  • Do-it-yourself: There are FOSS backup packages out now that use rsync as their back end but the nice thing here is that you are using standard command line tools (rsync, ssh, rm) so you can engineer your own backup system that will do EXACTLY what you want and you don’t need a special tool to restore.

Lire la suite…

Categories: Logiciel, Système Tags: , , ,

10 Amazing and Mysterious Uses of (!) Symbol or Operator in Linux Commands

10/01/2021 Aucun commentaire

Linux-logo-without-version-number-banner-sized-348x196The '!' symbol or operator in Linux can be used as Logical Negation operator as well as to fetch commands from history with tweaks or to run previously run command with modification. All the commands below have been checked explicitly in bash Shell. Though I have not checked but a major of these won’t run in other shell. Here we go into the amazing and mysterious uses of '!' symbol or operator in Linux commands.

1. Run a command from history by command number.

You might not be aware of the fact that you can run a command from your history command (already/earlier executed commands). To get started first find the command number by running ‘history‘ command.

$ history

History shell command

Now run a command from history just by the number at which it appears, in the output of history. Say run a command that appears at number 1551 in the output of ‘history‘ command.

$ !1551

History by number

And, it runs the command (top command in the above case), that was listed at number 1551. This way to retrieving already executed command is very helpful specially in case of those commands which are long. You just need to call it using ![Number at which it appears in the output of history command].

Lire la suite…

Categories: Système Tags: , ,

How to monitor a Linux server and desktop remotely from web browser

05/01/2021 Aucun commentaire

Monitoring Linux server

When it comes to monitoring a Linux server, there are more than enough options to choose from. While there are many production-quality monitoring solutions (e.g., Nagios, Zabbix, Zenoss), boasting of fancy UI, monitoring scalability, comprehensive reporting capabilities, etc., these solutions are probably an overkill for most of us end users. If all you need is to check the basic status (e.g., CPU load, memory usage, active processes, disk usage) of a remote Linux server or desktop, consider linux-dash.

linux-dash is a web-based lightweight monitoring dashboard for Linux machines, which can display, in real-time, various system properties, such as CPU load, RAM usage, disk usage, Internet speed, network connections, RX/TX bandwidth, logged-in users, running processes etc. linux-dash does not come with any backend database for storing long-term statistics. Simply drop in linux-dash app in an existing web server (e.g., Apache, Nginx), and you are good to go. It is a quick and easy way to set up remote monitoring for personal projects.

In this tutorial, I am going to describe how to set up linux-dash in Nginx web server on Linux. Nginx is preferred over Apache web server due to its lightweight engine.

Set up linux-dash on Debian, Ubuntu or Linux Mint

First, install Nginx web server with php-fpm.

$ sudo apt-get install git nginx php5-json php5-fpm php5-curl

Configure Nginx for linux-dash app by creating /etc/nginx/conf.d/linuxdash.conf as follows. In this example, we are going to use port 8080.

$ sudo vi /etc/nginx/conf.d/linuxdash.conf
server {
 server_name $domain_name;
 listen 8080;
 root /var/www;
 index index.html index.php;
 access_log /var/log/nginx/access.log;
 error_log /var/log/nginx/error.log;
 
 location ~* .(?:xml|ogg|mp3|mp4|ogv|svg|svgz|eot|otf|woff|ttf|css|js|jpg|jpeg|gif|png|ico)$ {
 try_files $uri =404;
 expires max;
 access_log off;
 add_header Pragma public;
 add_header Cache-Control "public, must-revalidate, proxy-revalidate";
 }
 
 location /linux-dash {
 index index.html index.php;
 }
 
 # PHP-FPM via sockets
 location ~ .php(/|$) {
 fastcgi_param SCRIPT_FILENAME $document_root$fastcgi_script_name;
 fastcgi_split_path_info ^(. ?.php)(/.*)$;
 fastcgi_pass unix:/var/run/php5-fpm.sock;
 if (!-f $document_root$fastcgi_script_name) {
 return 404;
 }
 try_files $uri $uri/ /index.php?$args;
 include fastcgi_params;
 }
}

Disable the default site configuration.

$ sudo rm /etc/nginx/sites-enabled/default

Configure php-fpm by editing /etc/php5/fpm/pool.d/www.conf. Make sure to edit “user“, “group” and “listen” directives as shown below. You can keep the rest of the configuration unchanged.

$ sudo vi /etc/php5/fpm/pool.d/www.conf

. . .
user = www-data
group = www-data
listen = /var/run/php5-fpm.sock
. . .

Proceed to download and install linux-dash.

$ git clone https://github.com/afaqurk/linux-dash.git
$ sudo cp -r linux-dash/ /var/www/
$ sudo chown -R www-data:www-data /var/www

Restart Nginx web server as well as php5-fpm to finalize installation.

$ sudo service php5-fpm restart
$ sudo service nginx restart

Lire la suite…

Ubuntu Linux Change Hostname (computer name)

17/12/2020 Comments off

I am a new Ubuntu Linux laptop user. I setup my computer name to ‘tom’ during installation but now I would like to change the computer name to ‘jerry’. Can you tell me how do I I remove tom and set it to jerry on Ubuntu Linux? How do I change the Ubuntu computer name from ‘ubuntu’ to ‘AvlinStar’? Can you tell me more about Ubuntu Linux change hostname command?

You can use the hostname command to see or set the system’s host name. The host name or computer name is usually at system startup in /etc/hostname file. Open the terminal application and type the following commands to set or change hostname or computer name on Ubuntu.

Display the current Ubuntu hostname

Simply type the following command:
$ hostname
Sample outputs:

Fig.01: Ubuntu Linux Show the hostname/computer name command
Fig.01: Ubuntu Linux Show the hostname/computer name command

Ubuntu change hostname command

The procedure to change the computer name on Ubuntu Linux:

  1. Type the following command to edit /etc/hostname using nano or vi text editor:
    sudo nano /etc/hostname
    Delete the old name and setup new name.
  2. Next Edit the /etc/hosts file:
    sudo nano /etc/hosts
    Replace any occurrence of the existing computer name with your new one.
  3. Reboot the system to changes take effect:
    sudo reboot

Sample outputs:

Gif 01: Ubuntu Linux Change Hostname Command Demo
Gif 01: Ubuntu change the computer name demo

How to change the Ubuntu server hostname without a system restart?

Type the following commands:
$ sudo hostname new-server-name-here
Next edit the /etc/hostname file and update hostname:
$ sudo nano /etc/hostname
Finally, edit the /etc/hosts file and update the lines that reads your old-host-name:
$ sudo nano /etc/hosts
From:
127.0.1.1 old-host-name
To:
127.0.1.1 new-server-name-here
Save and close the file.

Ubuntu Linux Change Hostname Using hostnamectl

Systemd based Linux distro such as Ubuntu Linux 16.04 LTS and above can simply use the hostnamectl command to change hostname. To see current setting just type the following command:
$ hostnamectl
Sample outputs:

   Static hostname: nixcraft
         Icon name: computer-laptop
           Chassis: laptop
        Machine ID: 291893e6499e4d99891c3cf4b70a138b
           Boot ID: 9fda2365b77841649e40a141fde46537
  Operating System: Ubuntu 17.10
            Kernel: Linux 4.13.0-21-generic
      Architecture: x86-64

To change hostname from nixcraft to viveks-laptop, enter:
$ hostnamectl set-hostname viveks-laptop
$ hostnamectl

Categories: Réseau, Système Tags: , ,