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Pipes and redirection

01/08/2021 Aucun commentaire

Many system administrators seem to have problems with the concepts of pipes and redirection in a shell. A coworker recently asked me how to deal with log files. How to find the information he was looking for. This article tries to shed some light on it.

Input / Output of shell commands

Many of the basic Linux/UNIX shell commands work in a similar way. Every command that you start from the shell gets three channels assigned:

  • STDIN (channel 0):
    Where your command draws the input from. If you don’t specify anything special this will be your keyboard input.
  • STDOUT (channel 1):
    Where your command’s output is sent to. If you don’t specify anything special the output is displayed in your shell.
  • STDERR (channel 2):
    If anything wrong happens the command will send error message here. By default the output is also displayed in your shell.

Try it yourself. The most basic command that just passes everything through from STDIN to STDOUT is the ‘cat’ command. Just open a shell and type ‘cat’ and press Enter. Nothing seems to happen. But actually ‘cat’ is waiting for input. Type something like “hello world”. Every time you press ‘Enter’ after a line ‘cat’ will output your input. So you will get an echo of everything you type. To let ‘cat’ know that you are done with the input send it an ‘end-of-file’ (EOF) signal by pressing Ctrl-D on an empty line.

The pipe(line)

A more interesting application of the STDIN/STDOUT is to chain commands together. The output of the first command becomes the input of the second command. Imagine the following chain:

grep-pipeline

The contents of the file /var/log/syslog are sent (as input) to the grep command. grep will filter the stream for lines containing the word ‘postfix’ and output that. Now the next grep picks up what was filtered and filter it further for the word ‘removed’. So now we have only lines containing both ‘postfix’ and ‘removed’. And finally these lines are sent to ‘wc -l’ which is a shell command counting the lines of some input. In my case it found 27 of such lines and printed that number to my shell. In shell syntax this reads:

cat /var/log/syslog | grep 'postfix' | grep 'removed' | wc -l

The ‘|’ character is called pipe. A sequence of such commands joined together with pipes are called pipeline.

Useless use of ‘cat’

Actually ‘cat’ is supposed to be used for concatenating files. Like “cat file1 file2”. But some administrators abuse the command to put something into a pipeline. That’s bad style and the reason why Randal L. Schwartz (a seasoned programmer) used to hand out virtual “Useless use of cat” awards. Shell commands usually can take a filename as the last argument as an input. So this would be right:

grep something /var/log/syslog | wc -l

While this works but is considered bad style:

cat /var/log/syslog | grep something | wc

Or if you knew that grep even has a “-c” option to count lines the whole task could be done with just grep:

grep -c something /var/log/syslog

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Categories: Système Tags: , ,

Nmon – A nifty little tool to monitor system resources on Linux

31/07/2021 Aucun commentaire

Source: binarytides.com

Nmon

Nmon (Nigel’s performance Monitor for Linux) is another very useful command line utility that can display information about various system resources like cpu, memory, disk, network etc. It was developed at IBM and later released open source.

It is available for most common architectures like x86, ARM and platforms like linux, unix etc. It is interactive and the output is well organised similar to htop.

Using Nmon it is possible to view the performance of different system resources on a single screen.
The man page describes nmon as

nmon is is a systems administrator, tuner, benchmark tool. It can display the CPU, memory, network, disks (mini graphs or numbers), file systems, NFS, top processes, resources (Linux version & processors) and on Power micro-partition information.

Project website
http://nmon.sourceforge.net/

Install Nmon

Debian/Ubuntu type distros have nmon in the default repos, so grab it with apt.

$ sudo apt-get install nmon

Fedora users can get it with yum

$ sudo yum install nmon

CentOS users need to install nmon from rpmforge/repoforge repository. It is not present in Epel.
Either download the correct rpm installer from

http://pkgs.repoforge.org/nmon/

Or setup the rpmforge repository by following the instructions here
http://wiki.centos.org/AdditionalResources/Repositories/RPMForge

And then install using yum

$ sudo yum install nmon

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Categories: Système Tags: ,

Glances gives a quick overview of system usage on Linux

30/07/2021 Aucun commentaire

Monitor your Linux system

glances system linuxAs a Linux sysadmin it feels great power when monitoring system resources like cpu, memory on the commandline. To peek inside the system is a good habit here atleast, because that’s one way of driving your Linux system safe. Plenty of tools like Htop, Nmon, Collectl, top and iotop etc help you accomplish the task. Today lets try another tool called Glances.

Glances

Glances is a tool similar to Nmon that has a very compact display to provide a complete overview of different system resources on just a single screen area. It does not support any complex functionality but just gives a brief overview CPU, Load, Memory, Network rate, Disk IO, file system, process number and details.

As a bonus, glances is actually cross platform, which means you can use it on obsolete OSes like windows :P.

Here’s a quick glimpse of it.

glances-linux

The output is color highlighted. Green indicates optimum levels of usage whereas red indicates that the particular resource is under heavy use.

$ glances -v
Glances version 1.6 with PsUtil 0.6.1

Project homepage https://github.com/nicolargo/glances http://nicolargo.github.io/glances/

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How do I change, sort, add, remove graphs with Munin?

22/07/2021 Aucun commentaire

Graphs on Munin

Enable and disable plugins on each node

graphs muninGraphs are added and removed via symlinks in the /etc/munin/plugins/ directory of the node.

To remove a graph you must remove the symlink and restart the node:

rm /etc/munin/plugins/diskstats
service munin-node restart

To add a graph you must add a symlink in the plugins directory to an executable. eg:

ln -s /usr/share/munin/plugins/diskstats /etc/munin/plugins/diskstats
service munin-node restart

When you restart munin-node it runs immediately and any issues with the plugins appears in /var/log/munin/munin-node.log. If all is going well you’ll see a CONNECT logged every cycle; this records the fact that the master connected to collect the latest data.

Process Backgrounded
2014/03/10-15:59:47 Munin::Node::Server (type Net::Server::Fork) starting! pid(32231)
Resolved [*]:4949 to [::]:4949, IPv6
Not including resolved host [0.0.0.0] IPv4 because it will be handled by [::] IPv6
Binding to TCP port 4949 on host :: with IPv6
2014/03/10-16:00:04 CONNECT TCP Peer: "[::ffff:203.28.51.227]:45965" Local: "[::ffff:50.23.111.122]:4949"
2014/03/10-16:05:04 CONNECT TCP Peer: "[::ffff:203.28.51.227]:46109" Local: "[::ffff:50.23.111.122]:4949"
2014/03/10-16:10:04 CONNECT TCP Peer: "[::ffff:203.28.51.227]:46109" Local: "[::ffff:50.23.111.122]:4949"

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An lsof Primer

18/07/2021 Comments off

Source: Daniel Miessler

lsof

lsof is the sysadmin/security über-tool. I use it most for getting network connection related information from a system, but that’s just the beginning for this powerful and too-little-known application. The tool is aptly called lsof because it “lists open files“. And remember, in UNIX just about everything (including a network socket) is a file.

Interestingly, lsof is also the Linux/Unix command with the most switches. It has so many it has to use both minuses and pluses.

usage: [-?abhlnNoOPRstUvV] [+|-c c] [+|-d s] [+D D] [+|-f[cgG]]
 [-F [f]] [-g [s]] [-i [i]] [+|-L [l]] [+|-M] [-o [o]]
 [-p s] [+|-r [t]] [-S [t]] [-T [t]] [-u s] [+|-w] [-x [fl]] [--] [names]

As you can see, lsof has a truly staggering number of options. You can use it to get information about devices on your system, what a given user is touching at any given point, or even what files or network connectivity a process is using.

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Categories: Système Tags: ,