Archive

Archives pour la catégorie ‘Système’

Easy Ubuntu 16.04 Server Firewall

21/01/2021 Aucun commentaire

If you read our previous article Easy Ubuntu Server Firewall, then you may have noted that on Ubuntu 16.04 the described method no longer works. This is due to systemd. In the article below we will walk through creating a persistent IPTables based firewall on Ubuntu 16.04 LTS. First we need to install some required software packages. As seen in the command below, install iptables-persistent. Next we will make netfilter-persistent run at boot. This is the most important step as it will ensure your rules are reloaded at boot time.

# Install IPTables Persistent Package
apt-get install -y iptables-persistent
# Add netfilter-persistent Startup
invoke-rc.d netfilter-persistent save
# Stop netfilter-persistent Service
service netfilter-persistent stop

Once the packages above are installed and the service is stopped, you will have a new directory at /etc/iptables/. This directory holds the IPTables filter rules that will be reloaded at boot time. These files are named rules.v4 and rules.v6 respectively. IPV4 rules are loaded into rules.v4 and IPV6 rules are loaded into rules.v6. For the purpose of this article we will focus on IPV4 rules. Next we will want to copy the rules below into our rules.v4 file. Of course the rules will need to be modified to fit your environment.

# Generated by iptables-save v1.3.3 on Wed Apr 9 10:51:08 2008
# Flush out any rules that are already in there
*filter
:INPUT ACCEPT [146:11332]
:FORWARD ACCEPT [0:0]
:OUTPUT ACCEPT [104:9831]
 
# Allow internal loopback connections
-A INPUT -i lo -j ACCEPT
-A OUTPUT -o lo -j ACCEPT
 
# Allow pinging
-A INPUT -p icmp -m icmp --icmp-type 8 -j ACCEPT
 
# Allow any outbound data, and any inbound data related to a connection that is already in use
-A INPUT -m state --state RELATED,ESTABLISHED -j ACCEPT
-A OUTPUT -m state --state NEW,RELATED,ESTABLISHED -j ACCEPT
 
# =========BEGIN SERVER SPECIFIC PORT OPEN RULES=========
# Allow SCP/SSH Access from Green & Blue Subnet
-A INPUT -s 172.16.12.0/255.255.255.0 -p tcp -m tcp --dport 22 -j ACCEPT
-A INPUT -s 10.10.12.0/255.255.255.0 -p tcp -m tcp --dport 22 -j ACCEPT
 
# Allow HTTP Access from Red Subnet/Internet
-A INPUT -p tcp -m state --state NEW,ESTABLISHED --dport 80 -j ACCEPT
 
# Allow HTTPS Access from Red Subnet/Internet
-A INPUT -p tcp -m state --state NEW,ESTABLISHED --dport 443 -j ACCEPT
 
# Allow MySQL Access from Red Subnet/Internet
-A INPUT -p tcp -m state --state NEW,ESTABLISHED --dport 3306 -j ACCEPT
 
# Allow FTP Access from Red Subnet/Internet
-A INPUT -p tcp -m state --state NEW,ESTABLISHED --dport 21 -j ACCEPT
-A INPUT -p tcp -m state --state NEW,ESTABLISHED --dport 58000:58010 -j ACCEPT
# =========END SERVER SPECIFIC PORT OPEN RULES=========
 
# Drop everything that hasn't been picked up by one of the rules above
-A INPUT -j DROP
-A FORWARD -j DROP
-A OUTPUT -j DROP
 
COMMIT
# Completed on Wed Apr 9 10:51:08 2008

Lastly, in order for our new rules to take affect, we simply need to start the netfilter-persistent service as seen below. That’s it, you now have a fully functional IPTables based firewall.

# Start netfilter-persistent Service
service netfilter-persistent start

# Check if IPTables were applied
iptables -L

Getting started with Let’s Encrypt SSL Certificates on Ubuntu

21/01/2021 Aucun commentaire

This tutorial will guide you through your very first configuration of an SSL website with Let’s Encrypt certification. Let’s Encrypt is a new SSL authority that provides free SSL certificates. We are going to use two existing tutorials (“How to setup an intermediate compatible SSL website with Let’s Encrypt certificate” and “The Perfect Server – Ubuntu 15.10 (Wily Werewolf) with Apache, PHP, MySQL, PureFTPD, BIND, Postfix, Dovecot and ISPConfig 3”).

The setup described here is compatible with any Ubuntu LAMP server, so you can use this one as the basis setup too.

This tutorial will show you how to setup Let’s Encrypt on Servers without ISPConfig 3 as there will be a direct implementation of the Let’s Encrypt service in the next ISPConfig 3 release (version 3.1) soon. So if you plan to use ISPConfig, wait for the 3.1 release and also a new tutorial.

Creating the website

The 1st step is to create the website configuration and directory and enable SSL (Apache mod_ssl) for it. It’s up to you if you use the default configuration for one website on a server or you plan to use multiple vhosts to host more than one domain. For more reliable and scalable usage, I’ll create a vhost configuration for my “lab” domain isp1.cloudapp.net from Azure.

Lire la suite…

Categories: Sécurité, Système Tags:

Inotify: Efficient, Real-Time Linux File System Event Monitoring

20/01/2021 Aucun commentaire

Summary – or why should I monitor the filesystem at all?

The need to scan a given filesystem for changes is a fairly common one, and there are a variety of common tasks which require this, including:

  • Notifying applications of changes in configuration files
  • Tracking changes in critical system files
  • Monitoring overall disk usage on a partition
  • Automatic cleanup after a crash
  • Automatic triggering of backup processes
  • Sending notifications when the upload of a file to a server completes

A common approach to doing this sort of change notification is file polling, however this tends to be inefficient for all but the most frequently-changed files (since you have a guaranteed I/O every X seconds) and can miss certain types of changes (e.g. if the modification timestamp on a file isn’t changed). Data integrity systems like Tripwire track file changes based on a fixed time schedule, but the time-scheduled approach doesn’t work if you want to be notified every time it changes in real-time – just as an event takes place. A framework which fulfills that requirement is Inotify. In this article we will walk through how to use Inotify to monitor directories and trigger alerts on changes and present tools you might want to add to your personal toolbox.

Lire la suite…

Categories: Sécurité, Système Tags:

HowTo: The Ultimate Logrotate Command Tutorial with 10 Examples

19/01/2021 Aucun commentaire

Managing log files effectively is an essential task for Linux sysadmin.

In this article, let us discuss how to perform following log file operations using UNIX logrotateutility.

  • Rotate the log file when file size reaches a specific size
  • Continue to write the log information to the newly created file after rotating the old log file
  • Compress the rotated log files
  • Specify compression option for the rotated log files
  • Rotate the old log files with the date in the filename
  • Execute custom shell scripts immediately after log rotation
  • Remove older rotated log files

1. Logrotate Configuration files

Following are the key files that you should be aware of for logrotate to work properly.

/usr/sbin/logrotate – The logrotate command itself.

/etc/cron.daily/logrotate – This shell script executes the logrotate command everyday.

$ cat /etc/cron.daily/logrotate
#!/bin/sh

/usr/sbin/logrotate /etc/logrotate.conf
EXITVALUE=$?
if [ $EXITVALUE != 0 ]; then
    /usr/bin/logger -t logrotate "ALERT exited abnormally with [$EXITVALUE]"
fi
exit 0

/etc/logrotate.conf – Log rotation configuration for all the log files are specified in this file.

 

$ cat /etc/logrotate.conf
weekly
rotate 4
create
include /etc/logrotate.d
/var/log/wtmp {
    monthly
    minsize 1M
    create 0664 root utmp
    rotate 1
}

/etc/logrotate.d – When individual packages are installed on the system, they drop the log rotation configuration information in this directory. For example, yum log rotate configuration information is shown below.

$ cat /etc/logrotate.d/yum
/var/log/yum.log {
    missingok
    notifempty
    size 30k
    yearly
    create 0600 root root
}

2. Logrotate size option: Rotate the log file when file size reaches a specific limit

If you want to rotate a log file (for example, /tmp/output.log) for every 1KB, create the logrotate.conf as shown below.

$ cat logrotate.conf
/tmp/output.log {
        size 1k
        create 700 bala bala
        rotate 4
}

This logrotate configuration has following three options:

  • size 1k – logrotate runs only if the filesize is equal to (or greater than) this size.
  • create – rotate the original file and create the new file with specified permission, user and group.
  • rotate – limits the number of log file rotation. So, this would keep only the recent 4 rotated log files.

Before the logrotation, following is the size of the output.log:

$ ls -l /tmp/output.log
-rw-r--r-- 1 bala bala 25868 2010-06-09 21:19 /tmp/output.log

Now, run the logrotate command as shown below. Option -s specifies the filename to write the logrotate status.

$ logrotate -s /var/log/logstatus logrotate.conf

Note : whenever you need of log rotation for some files, prepare the logrotate configuration and run the logroate command manually.
After the logrotation, following is the size of the output.log:

$ ls -l /tmp/output*
-rw-r--r--  1 bala bala 25868 2010-06-09 21:20 output.log.1
-rwx------ 1 bala bala        0 2010-06-09 21:20 output.log

Eventually this will keep following setup of rotated log files.

  • output.log.4.
  • output.log.3
  • output.log.2
  • output.log.1
  • output.log

Please remember that after the log rotation, the log file corresponds to the service would still point to rotated file (output.log.1) and keeps on writing in it. You can use the above method, if you want to rotate the apache access_log or error_log every 5 MB.

Ideally, you should modify the /etc/logrotate.conf to specify the logrotate information for a specific log file.

Also, if you are having huge log files, you can use: 10 Awesome Examples for Viewing Huge Log Files in Unix

3. Logrotate copytruncate option: Continue to write the log information in the newly created file after rotating the old log file.

$ cat logrotate.conf
/tmp/output.log {
         size 1k
         copytruncate
         rotate 4
}

copytruncate instruct logrotate to creates the copy of the original file (i.e rotate the original log file) and truncates the original file to zero byte size. This helps the respective service that belongs to that log file can write to the proper file.

While manipulating log files, you might find the sed substitutesed delete tips helpful.

4. Logrotate compress option: Compress the rotated log files

If you use the compress option as shown below, the rotated files will be compressed with gzip utility.

$ cat logrotate.conf
/tmp/output.log {
        size 1k
        copytruncate
        create 700 bala bala
        rotate 4
        compress
}

Output of compressed log file:

$ ls /tmp/output*
output.log.1.gz output.log

5. Logrotate dateext option: Rotate the old log file with date in the log filename

$ cat logrotate.conf
/tmp/output.log {
        size 1k
        copytruncate
        create 700 bala bala
        dateext
        rotate 4
        compress
}

After the above configuration, you’ll notice the date in the rotated log file as shown below.

$ ls -lrt /tmp/output*
-rw-r--r--  1 bala bala 8980 2010-06-09 22:10 output.log-20100609.gz
-rwxrwxrwx 1 bala bala     0 2010-06-09 22:11 output.log

This would work only once in a day. Because when it tries to rotate next time on the same day, earlier rotated file will be having the same filename. So, the logrotate wont be successful after the first run on the same day.

Typically you might use tail -f to view the output of the log file in realtime. You can even combine multiple tail -f output and display it on single terminal.

6. Logrotate monthly, daily, weekly option: Rotate the log file weekly/daily/monthly

For doing the rotation monthly once,

$ cat logrotate.conf
/tmp/output.log {
        monthly
        copytruncate
        rotate 4
        compress
}

Add the weekly keyword as shown below for weekly log rotation.

$ cat logrotate.conf
/tmp/output.log {
        weekly
        copytruncate
        rotate 4
        compress
}

Add the daily keyword as shown below for every day log rotation. You can also rotate logs hourly.

$ cat logrotate.conf
/tmp/output.log {
        daily
        copytruncate
        rotate 4
        compress
}

7. Logrotate postrotate endscript option: Run custom shell scripts immediately after log rotation

Logrotate allows you to run your own custom shell scripts after it completes the log file rotation. The following configuration indicates that it will execute myscript.sh after the logrotation.

$ cat logrotate.conf
/tmp/output.log {
        size 1k
        copytruncate
        rotate 4
        compress
        postrotate
               /home/bala/myscript.sh
        endscript
}

8. Logrotate maxage option: Remove older rotated log files

Logrotate automatically removes the rotated files after a specific number of days.  The following example indicates that the rotated log files would be removed after 100 days.

$ cat logrotate.conf
/tmp/output.log {
        size 1k
        copytruncate
        rotate 4
        compress
        maxage 100
}

9. Logrotate missingok option: Dont return error if the log file is missing

You can ignore the error message when the actual file is not available by using this option as shown below.

$ cat logrotate.conf
/tmp/output.log {
        size 1k
        copytruncate
        rotate 4
        compress
        missingok
}

10. Logrotate compresscmd and compressext option: Sspecify compression command for the log file rotation

$ cat logrotate.conf
/tmp/output.log {
        size 1k
        copytruncate
        create
        compress
        compresscmd /bin/bzip2
        compressext .bz2
        rotate 4
}

Following compression options are specified above:

  • compress – Indicates that compression should be done.
  • compresscmd – Specify what type of compression command should be used. For example: /bin/bzip2
  • compressext – Specify the extension on the rotated log file. Without this option, the rotated file would have the default extension as .gz. So, if you use bzip2 compressioncmd, specify the extension as .bz2 as shown in the above example.
 
Categories: Système, Tutoriel Tags:

How can I find out if a specific program is installed?

19/01/2021 Aucun commentaire

there’s always apt-cache policy <package-name> (no sudo needed).

Not installed:

olivier@neews:/$ apt-cache policy gnuift
 gnuift:
   Installed: (none)
   Candidate: 0.1.14-11
   Version table:
      0.1.14-11 0
         500 http://archive.ubuntu.com/ubuntu/ oneiric/universe amd64 Packages

Installed:

olivier@neews:/$ apt-cache policy firefox
 firefox:
   Installed: 8.0+build1-0ubuntu0.11.10.3
   Candidate: 8.0+build1-0ubuntu0.11.10.3
   Version table:
  *** 8.0+build1-0ubuntu0.11.10.3 0
         500 http://archive.ubuntu.com/ubuntu/ oneiric-updates/main amd64 Packages
         500 http://archive.ubuntu.com/ubuntu/ oneiric-security/main amd64 Packages
         100 /var/lib/dpkg/status
      7.0.1+build1+nobinonly-0ubuntu2 0
         500 http://archive.ubuntu.com/ubuntu/ oneiric/main amd64 Packages

Or dpkg: dpkg -l | grep -E '^ii' | grep <package name>. When it’s not installed it won’t show output. When it is, it’ll show something like:

olivier@neews:~$ dpkg -l | grep -E '^ii' | grep firefox
 ii  firefox                                                     8.0+build1-0ubuntu0.11.10.3                            Safe and easy web browser from Mozilla
 ii  firefox-branding                                            8.0+build1-0ubuntu0.11.10.3                            Safe and easy web browser from Mozilla - transitional package
 ii  firefox-globalmenu                                          8.0+build1-0ubuntu0.11.10.3                            Unity appmenu integration for Firefox
 ii  firefox-gnome-support                                       8.0+build1-0ubuntu0.11.10.3                            Safe and easy web browser from Mozilla - GNOME support
 ii  firefox-locale-en                                           8.0+build1-0ubuntu0.11.10.3                            English language pack for Firefox
It's obviously a fuzzier search but handy if you're not sure which package you're looking for.
 
 For manually installed things...
 
 A bit harder but if they're on the current path, you could just run them. That's a bit of mission so I'd rather just run:
 
 oli@bert:/$ which chromium-browser
 /usr/bin/chromium-browser

And:

oli@bert:/$ which gnuift
# returns nothing

Which is better?

That depends on the sanity of user. There’s nothing to stop somebody installing something called chromium-browser that isn’t Chromium. They could even package it up incorrectly and install that. Neither method can be 100% certain.

But assuming the owner is sane – packages should be good enough for most people.

Categories: Système Tags: , , ,